Cookham Discussion Board

General Category => General Cookham Discussions => Topic started by: Cookham Webmaster on August 01, 2008, 09:51:24 AM



Title: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Cookham Webmaster on August 01, 2008, 09:51:24 AM
This e-mail was received from James Hatch in Canada

I have been thinking a lot lately about Cookham history of 60 & 70 years ago. I would like to hear from those memory is still vivid of those years. My memory gets a refresh everytime I see the video "Good Night Mr. Tom."
 
I mean there must be a few like myself who are computer literate who lived in the village during that era, an era when the village pulled together as one, with some very interesting stories to be told, those who remember and I quote nom-de-plumes of several characters:
 
"Big Ben", "Agnes Halfpenny", "The Gaffer", "Toots Wooten", "Mrs. Cheeseman", "YaYa Hughes", "Dad Sexton", "Dolly Drew", "Snotty Graham", "Sally Salberg" and "Gandhi Wheeler" That is just a few that went to make up the village colour.
 
Anyone with these memories and would like to tell me their stories they can reach me via e-mail at: ve7cij@rac.ca As I am needing some more flesh to add to the skeleton of my book based on that period.
 
Regards,
 
Jim Hatch


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Rob on August 01, 2008, 11:04:53 AM
73 with that Jim! ;D


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 02, 2008, 01:38:31 AM
Well I have Rob for one with his coded 73. OK Rob I will CQ you later as I am off out to " The Bard & Banker" for a nosch! I will grab time to send you a note in the next few days.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 02, 2008, 05:53:49 AM
Rob just a quick note to say your e-mail address is not working for some reason. Also I am looking for people who are computer literate and lived in the village in the 1930's-40's & 50's. Even if like myself now live on Canada's West Coast on Vancouver Island in the provincial capital of British Columbia, Victoria. O.K. I am closing up on four score years and yet I still keep at it. As I tell people. "For goverment purposes I am retired on paper but, NOT FROM LIFE!"


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Rob on August 02, 2008, 02:02:35 PM
Thanks for info re E Mail Jim. Have sent you one.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 04, 2008, 02:25:24 PM
Hi Rob:

I sent you more information on your area with names of fields asw they were once known. Did you receive it?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on August 05, 2008, 12:28:16 PM
I was born in Cookham in 1941, went to Holy Trinity School, the village had all the shops you needed such as International Stores, greengrocers (Mr Sims) post office, bank, tea shop (Mrs Wilmink) unfortunately it is not like that now. My parents and grandparents have also lived here all their lives, if you came back here you would certainly see a difference with buses up and down the Pound.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 05, 2008, 03:02:06 PM
Ah! Mrs. Wilmink and her greengrocery shop. Her husband ran a taxi business remember. Was Mrs. Vale's sweetshop in exsistance then. But of course you would have remembered Reg & Maggi Moon who ran the Torquill Pottery and The Torquill Restaurant. Remember the Copper Kettle? The International Stores manager was Harold "Tacker" Aplin.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on August 05, 2008, 05:09:27 PM
I worked for Reg and Mag Moon in the Torquil coffee bar feeding the staff from Caurtaulds Moor Hall when they came for lunch. I remember Mr Aplin. There was Bromley the baker and Mrs Baker ran the Kings Arms pub/hotel, that certainly has changed. Reg and Mag also had the pottery which now houses a dress shop called Plume. Oh how things have changed.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 05, 2008, 05:24:45 PM
After the pubs closed on a friday night we use to gather at The Torquill for one of Reg's famous "Mushroom Omlets" a cup of coffee and play chess. When they closed up I think they moved to Worcester. A sad day when they left the village.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on August 05, 2008, 05:30:15 PM
If you can get one of your relatives in Cookham to send you a copy of Cookham Voices I think you will find that very interesting.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 05, 2008, 05:31:49 PM
Now I am going to test you all for local knowledge:

Does anybody remember "Ginger Nut?"

Who or what was he? Where was his home in the village? His birth place still stands.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 05, 2008, 07:25:25 PM
Here is another question for all you Spencer buffs:

Name Stanley's two brothers and what were they famous for?

Also, who in the village had White Cockatoo? Which could be readily seen and heard every summer.

What was the name of the village postman, who had a second business in the village?

What was Pryce-Jones favourite trick he played on the village children? Hint he kept it in a box lined with cottonwool.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 06, 2008, 09:12:02 PM
Going back again in history. Can any reader name the person who ran the second school in school lane. To help you it was what one would term a nursery or pre school. Some of the village residents I know attended there, these I am sure will remember!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 07, 2008, 12:23:24 AM
Cookham at one time had 13 pubs and 1 off licence. One pub that has now been demolished was the [b]"GATE HOTEL"[/b] The hotel signboard swung freely from over the door. At the bottom of the board was written a four line message. Is there anyone around that can write up those four lines word for word.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Historian on August 07, 2008, 11:38:01 AM
Talking of Cookham history - does anyone know the story of the Cookham Minute or 'Cookham Mean Time' as it's sometimes known?

Apparently, King John came on a progress through the village in 1212. He was expected by noon but came  a minute late. Rather than admit the King was not punctual (tantamount to treason!), the clocks were put forward by a minute.

Amazingly, this action was never reversed and so Cookham has remained a minute ahead of the rest of the country eversince!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Historian on August 07, 2008, 11:42:17 AM
Of course, I mean they put the clocks back by a minute.

Sorry! Interesting story, none the less.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on August 07, 2008, 12:05:03 PM
Was it 'The gate hangs high'


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 07, 2008, 02:10:22 PM
Hi Monty"
That is the first line. What are the other three lines?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Monty on August 08, 2008, 04:10:13 PM
The Gate Pub sign says:

THIS GATE HANGS HIGH AND HINDERS NONE, REFRESH AND PAY AND TRAVEL ON - a Mr Thompson was once a landlrd there.

 ::)



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 08, 2008, 05:13:25 PM
Almost word for word Monty, So give that man a Cupee Doll.

The Gate Hangs High
And Hinders None
To Refresh and Pay
And Carry On.

Those were the exact words under the painting of a five bar field gate leading into a meadow.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Monty on August 08, 2008, 05:18:28 PM
Glad I got it nearly right and I am a lady not a fella - sorry ???


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 09, 2008, 12:42:06 AM
Well Monty sorry about that! Anyway you would enjoy a cuddly Cupee Doll wouldn't you? At least we can bring history to light for all to know.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 09, 2008, 09:03:27 AM
Does anyone remember the WI building on Kennel Lane. Famous for its wartime Whist Drives?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 12, 2008, 03:59:20 AM
Let us try you with another Cookham Quiz question. If you went into one of Cookhams Public Houses a hundred years ago and ordered a "Pot of Ale" what would the liquid measure be. My grandfather drank nothing less.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Hotspur on August 12, 2008, 10:19:42 AM
“I would give all my fame for a pot of ale and safety.”

William Shakespeare, ‘King Henry V’   


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 12, 2008, 02:16:24 PM
Yes Hotspur: The quote was fine! but, what was the liquid measure imperial!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Old Fogey on August 12, 2008, 04:56:34 PM
Please tell us, James, as we may need to reinvent this measure.

Love the joke about the Cookham minute. But you can imagine Cookham's manorial court officers checking the very basic scratch dial on the side of the church or manor court house if they awaited King John's entourage (no sun today, good fellows, so methinks we must guess the hour).



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 12, 2008, 05:21:58 PM
First of all time measure. Did you ever notice that there is a sun dial on the south face of the church tower. The church clock is kept wound by the church bell ringers. The clock face in the ringing chamber runs backwards or in an anti-clock direction. The clock itself and the clock chime are run off a weigth and cable system with a very large pendulum to keep time correct. At least this is as it was in 2000 when I last pulled a rope on the tenor bell.

"The Pot" measure I know what it was, but I want someone to dig for the answer.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 13, 2008, 05:23:05 PM
To carry on from the last but one:
Love the joke about the Cookham minute. But you can imagine Cookham's manorial court officers checking the very basic scratch dial on the side of the church or manor court house if they awaited King John's entourage (no sun today, good fellows, so methinks we must guess the hour).

A horseman rides into the manor courtyard "The Kings coach is stuck in Widdebrook, and requests two of your best shire horses to pull him out" Now that would be something of historical note!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Interested on August 13, 2008, 05:41:31 PM
Facinating stuff in this discussion. I'm relatively new to Cookham Dean and it's great to hear about the old memories. Just wondering if anyone has any old photographs they can share, and selfishly I would be very interested to see some around Bigfrith common and the Jolly Farmer and Church. 


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Rover on August 13, 2008, 06:05:51 PM
Interested, there are a few old photos of Cookham Dean on the Cookham website. If you go to www.cookham.com (http://www.cookham.com) and scroll down the left hand menu they are in Photogallery under the section About Cookham. Choose Old Cookham for some old photos.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 13, 2008, 06:06:45 PM
Welcome aboard "Just Installed" Village history abounds and that is why this section was started. My suggestion is that you drop Liz Kwantes at Cookham.com an e-mail. I am sure she will be pleased to direct you.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 14, 2008, 05:01:22 PM
Thinking about "Slogger" Smith brings to mind another football wiz-kid. As the Slogger was tall, this lad was very small and quick on his feet. Another Charlie! This time it was Charlie "Waggle" Coles, he lived up in Cookham Dean and had a sister Edith.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 18, 2008, 06:05:22 PM
The original sign over the door of the Gate Hotel had this phrase:

The Gate hangs high,
and hinders none.
Refresh and pay,
and travel on.

So there is a little change from later wording. But there as I have always said phrases do change like:

The General in a battle zone sent word down via the trench network:

"Send reinforcements, I'm going to advance!"

at HQ the message was received:

"Send three and fourpence I'm going to a dance!"


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: CH on August 18, 2008, 10:18:36 PM
Please, someone save us from this!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: bemused on August 19, 2008, 09:53:23 AM
Who is this lunatic that has launched a one man spam offensive against the boards?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Andy on August 19, 2008, 11:17:05 AM
Whose complaining, bemused? James Hatch has livened up the website no end and this lighthearted look at Cookham's history is interesting. It's about time we had a bit of fun on these discussions instead of all the moaning and sniping we sometimes get about what is happening here now.

We are still waiting to hear about the pot of ale measure, James - all I could find  as a 'pot of ale' was a measure of two quarts, but would your grandfather really have drunk that in one go very time he went into the pub?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 19, 2008, 05:05:24 PM
Thank you for your kind words Andy. Alright I will keep you waiting no longer. A "POT"  measure is a quart. In Europe of course it is still carried out with the "Stein" which I believe is one litre. Farm workers when Haymaking or at Harvest, you would always find a barrel of beer in the shade for the men to quench their thirst. Today of course people run around with plastic bottles of water.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: hayley on August 20, 2008, 07:18:15 AM
care bear ..............


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Archimedes on August 20, 2008, 10:31:00 AM
I don't think it is as symplistic as that James. If a planning application is put in, which in the case of CD Post Office it has been, the council will look at whether the plans meet the planning rules or not, which are quite specific. A group of people going to the council saying we want our old post office and stores back is not reason for the Council not to grant planning permission. If we fight the plans on some other reason, which may be difficult and I am not sure what they could be, what do we want, an empty store that slowly goes to rack and ruin? If we can't find someone to take on the whole business, we may be better off with some flats and a smaller store with possibly the owners on site, at least we have a store and Post Office not an empty shop.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 21, 2008, 02:49:08 PM
It might not be simplistic! On the other hand it is no good sitting back and bemoaning the fact in your computer chair!!!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 22, 2008, 08:45:10 PM
Now let us get back to history: Bombs fell in the Cookham area during the second world war. Question: Can anyone tell me where? One very large bomb shrapnel fragment landed in Cookham High Street. Where did it go on show for the longest time?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Marie on August 24, 2008, 11:03:22 AM
Am not old enough to have had first hand experience, but was told they were dropped in the early morning in a line close to Long Lane, Kennel Lane and the field off Terrys Lane near Greythatch. Don't know the date. Where was one on display?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 24, 2008, 04:43:14 PM
Well Marie you were good enough to ask some old timers what they remember. So you are deserving of a quick reply:

The bomb I was thinking of in particular landed very close to the railway bridge crossing the Thames. As with all boys we had to go and see the crater for ourselves. I will be describing and show the exact location in the near future in my Blog " Historical Cookham "  This blog is of fact that I have known personally and happened while I was living in Cookham.

The large piece of shrapnel that landed in the High Street was between the Kings Arms and what was then Dudley Sims the Butchers. The fragment was for the longest time part of the window display in the butchers shop.

The others I knew of but, as I did not see the craters at that time I can give no exact location.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 28, 2008, 05:49:53 PM
This is to announce the fact that under Cookham Blogger you will now find "Historical Cookham." This brings to light some of Cookham's colourful past, and some of the characters that made it tick.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 29, 2008, 11:48:44 PM
See and read the latest entry in "Historical Cookham." blog. This time covering a Sunday afternoon stroll around the "Three Ferries."


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 01, 2008, 02:04:18 PM
Here is a question for the younger readers: "What year the last was Toll collected for passing over Cookham Bridge?"


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 02, 2008, 08:21:45 PM
There is an interesting blog in "Historical Cookham" on boundary markers, just posted.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 03, 2008, 07:34:21 PM
Question that could be used at a pub quiz night: "Cookham Lock is a Pound Lock." Why is it called that, and what is a lock pound?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: roger on September 04, 2008, 12:18:58 AM
James is this right?

Pound locks were created in medieval China during the Song Dynasty (960–1279 AD), pioneered by the government official and engineer Qiao Weiyo in 984, mentioned by the Chinese polymath scientist Shen Kuo (1031–1095) in his book Dream Pool Essays (published in 1088) and fully described in the Chinese historical text Song Shi (compiled in 1345).

In medieval Europe a type of pound lock was first built in 1373 at Vreeswijk, the Netherlands. This pound lock serviced many ships at once in a large basin, yet the true pound lock (i.e. one for a small basin) came in 1396 with the one built at Damme near Bruges. A famous civil engineer of pound locks in Europe was the Italian Bertola da Novate (c. 1410-1475), who constructed 18 of them on the Naviglio di Bereguardo (part of the Milan canal system sponsored by Francesco Sforza) between the years 1452 and 1458.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 04, 2008, 01:00:12 AM
Hi Roger: You are right in part but, you missed my question of: "What is the meaning of the word Pound in Pound Lock?" Here anyway is the answer: The Pound is that chamber between the two sets of lock gates, in which the water can be raised or lowered as required, to provide passage of ships or river craft.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: CH on September 04, 2008, 10:29:54 AM
If only he'd copied and pasted the first paragraph from Wikipedia in addition to the History section, he'd have covered that too.  Never mind.  ;D


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 04, 2008, 02:35:03 PM
Well CH, I am glad to see it got you looking as well! Take a look at "Historical Cookham"  http://widbrook2.blogspot.com/ and you learn some more.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 05, 2008, 01:13:39 AM
Just added a giant that use to be common in the 1930's and 1940's to the history page.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on September 05, 2008, 11:46:43 AM
James, I have a question for you. What is the original meaning of Cookham?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Deanite on September 05, 2008, 12:49:52 PM
Another question - do you (or any other reader) know why "Uncle Tom's Cabin" in Cookham Dean is so called?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 05, 2008, 05:12:12 PM
Well I have two to answer at once:
Let us take the word ham and examine that. There are several meanings that have been used in different parts of the country including the spelling the word as "Hamme" of Saxon/German origin meaning a sharp bend in the river. Which in this case there is at Hedsor. Another term of the word "Ham" is for a fenced in area of land close to water. Then again the word can mean home, or a small group of homes to make a "Hamlet." As for the word Cook, that has been changed quite a lot from Norman times right through the middle ages. Only the learned scholars like the monks wrote anything, so spelling became phonetic and always on the change. I have not gone into the roots as yet. I will when I get to it.

Now for Uncle Tom's Cabin. Pub names came by various roots. In this case I think the name you will find goes back to the middle 1800's and the book by Harriet Beacher Stowe of that name written in 1852. This is my thought at this time. Though I do know for a fact that there has been at least one landlord of that establishment whose name was "TOM."


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Deanite on September 05, 2008, 05:45:25 PM
Thanks James.  I knew about the book; I was just wondering why a pub in the middle of the English countryside would be named after an American book.  I have heard various theories - it was opened by a relative of Harriet Beecher Stowe, it was opened by a freed slave (likelihood - nil) and also it was opened by the UK publisher of the book with royalties earned.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 05, 2008, 06:05:54 PM
Well it was at least one pub along with The Jolly Farmer, and Chequers to still keep their names. Bring back the "Hare & Hounds" or, will that upset the anti blood sport lobby I wonder?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 06, 2008, 08:11:46 PM
It's History time again! This time Cookham & District Fire Brigade. Those selfless villagers who volunteered to protect our homes against fire a 100 years ago. You can read it all on the "Historical Cookham" Blog.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 07, 2008, 01:54:43 AM
In this latest blog on Historical Cookham is the story of "Thomas John Fowler" as I new him. Friend, Bell Ringer, and fellow choir member and wartime Special Constable.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Archimedes on September 07, 2008, 12:18:08 PM
To save you time James it is thought that Cookham is derived from “Cwch-ium” - Celtic for Boat-Place.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 07, 2008, 03:27:52 PM
Yes, that is one source of thought. Then you have to take the fact that the last three letters "HAM" occur as in Burnham for instance. Then you have Southamton, or break it down as South Ham Town. This could be termed as a town in the south by water. No, I do not give up at the first possible answer, there is more to it than that. Remember that compulsory education has only been with us since November 1870. Prior to that communication, was by word of mouth for most of the population. Before television and the second world war how many dialects there were in England alone, each with their own spelling. No there has to be more to it than that.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 07, 2008, 08:58:05 PM
There is now a list of people who had a business or a profession in the village in 1839. There are some names there that are still around today.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Archimedes on September 08, 2008, 01:57:31 PM
James, the derivation of the name Southampton is from the original Anglo Saxon town of Hamwic (then later Hamtun) which I suppose means market town as wics were trading places. Similarly Burnham burn = water and ham = village. You need to be careful with assuming ham means small town/village though as hamil means a hill without trees.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 09, 2008, 03:14:28 PM
You know Archimedes, there are so many names given to the same object or place due to the fact that we were population that did move about very much, and communication was the spoken word. The spelling of the written word was phonetic when ever it was applied. The scribes in the middle ages were mainly monks and there wrote in Latin. That is why it is so difficult to say which one is corect, as they all mean the same thing, but coming from different directions. Maybe that is why the Hatch family have the motto: "FORTIS VALORE ET ARMIS" Which translated means: STRONG IN COURAGE AND ARMS.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Monty on September 10, 2008, 11:58:36 AM
Your input regarding Cookham Fire Brigade my grandfather Fred Robinson was Fire Chief there while I was a child.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 10, 2008, 03:08:30 PM
Good to hear from you Monty. That would have been at the location in Terry's Lane, when Mr. Pinder-Brown was the driving force behind the brigade. My uncle W.T.G. Hatch joined the brigade when they relocated to Berries Road and he was living at the Widbrook Nursery where Sutton Close now stands.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on September 11, 2008, 12:15:21 PM
Yes he lived at 3 Terrys Lane and he had a lovely brass helmet and I think we were lucky as we go a telephone


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 11, 2008, 02:37:17 PM
By the way Monty if I memory serves me right, every member of the brigade had a telephone line with just a bell attached. In the case of a fire the bell would ring to summon members to the fire station.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on September 12, 2008, 12:04:31 PM
Yes that is right.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 12, 2008, 06:22:33 PM
Another question for you Monty: Do you remember a good friend and fellow fireman of your grandfather, Harry Dodd? I went to school with his daughter Betty. I wonder if any of the Dodd family are still around in the village?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on September 13, 2008, 02:40:03 PM
Yes I do remember Harry Dodd and Betty and they lived in Lower Road opposite the chemist, but I think Betty has passed on.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 13, 2008, 03:39:56 PM
Thank you Monty: One more that you may know of, John Webb. Is he still in the village?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Joe on September 14, 2008, 01:09:41 AM
Hi there - I don't live in Cookham, but my family, the paper-making Venables, did. I've added a couple of comments to the 1839 list and the story of the Tarrystone theft (I should formally apologise for that on my great-great-grandfather's behalf - but the family paid quite a price, the curse was absolutely real I think).

I'm posting here partly because I'd like to share a newspaper account of Mary Venables' wedding in 1867 which has a wonderful description of the whole village illuminated for the day. And if I'm right in making the connection, James Hatch's great-great-grandfather is one of the innkeepers mentioned - where would be the best place to put that up please?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Showem on September 14, 2008, 12:39:53 PM
Here is as good a place as any for it Joe. Or contact the webmaster (webmaster@cookham.com) and maybe she can put it up as an article on the front page.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on September 14, 2008, 02:33:16 PM
Joe, you could ask James to put any history information on his history blog too.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 14, 2008, 03:40:49 PM
Joe: Welcome to this Discussion Page on behalf of our ancestors. Please contact me direct at ve7cij@rac.ca I would love to have any material that you can send me to add to my "HISTORICAL COOKHAM" blog. This way the present day residents of the village get to know more of the village past.
Regards,
James Hatch


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 14, 2008, 11:22:41 PM
Well here are some more facts that I have dug up for you all, and is now posted on the Historical Cookham Blog: For instance Holy Trinity School was built in 1858. It seems that the Infants classroom was built soon after two local benefactors paid for the addition. It interesting to think the school goes back 150 years.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 15, 2008, 06:38:15 PM
Two more Blogs on Holy Trinity School. I think you may have relatives who were students in 1922.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on September 15, 2008, 08:10:10 PM
I attended Holy Trinity from 1945 to 1950 even through the floods of 1947. we went to school in boats,and as we lived in Terrys Lane the water came right into our outside toilet, no inside convenience in those days.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 16, 2008, 12:27:30 AM
Hi Monty: Any photos you have of the 1947 flood on hand I could make good use of. I do want to get all viewpoints from those that were here. This way we can produce the facts. By the way was the Robinson in the 1922 School photo a relation?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 16, 2008, 07:46:05 PM
We now step back in time some 300,000 years, in fact to our early ancestors "The Chellean Man". We swing from 50 years ago to the earliest records. That is the fun of history, it give one a very wide perspective of life. Too much today is consentrated in a "TUNNEL VISION" aspect.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Monty on September 16, 2008, 07:59:15 PM
Robinson in the photo, which I have not seen is probably my mother who was born in 1914.her name was Lucy Robinson then on marriage became Lucy Edwards


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Joe on September 16, 2008, 08:24:41 PM
I've sent the report and several Venables portraits to James, so hopefully they'll be appearing very soon...

Are there by any chance any descendants of the Fords still around in the area? Jane Ford, daughter of an innkeeper, was the Venables' cook at the Mill House for many years - I'd love to know more about her.

I'd also be fascinated if anyone's ancestors worked at the Mill.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 16, 2008, 10:15:47 PM
Hi Monty: Yes, that is the one I came up with Lucy Mary Robinson born on the 30th of September 1914.
The photo is in the Blog.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 16, 2008, 10:20:07 PM
Hi Joe: Thank you once again, and I will be posting them shortly. You should also receive an e-mail from me with the pictures as they will appear.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 17, 2008, 03:12:59 PM
Another photo from Holy Trinity Schools past has just turned up. This one from the late 1800's. Maybe your grandparents are in it. If you have any old picture of your grandparents who were living in the village, please let me know.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 18, 2008, 11:56:46 PM
We now step back in time some 176 years and have been able to bring to light in living colour Mary and George Venables just prior to their wedding in 1832.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 26, 2008, 07:54:06 PM
I have just updated the Historical Cookham Blog with what I am calling the "Two Mary's". It is of Mrs. Mary Venables, sometime in the late 1800's, and quite close together, as you can't realy tell which is the older photograph.

Once again thanks to Joe Fisher who provided me with the material.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 28, 2008, 02:54:27 AM
Facts have just come to my attention that Paper Making was in exsistance in the village in the early 1700's. I will be posting more in the Blog shortly.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on September 28, 2008, 12:12:37 PM
During Elizabeth I's reign some mills used for corn grinding started to convert them to paper making, although I believe the Chinese had been making paper for quite a long time before us. This area was particularly good because of the fast flowing streams around. Cookham still has Mill Lane and of course there were paper mills at Taplow and Wooburn until not so long ago. It is thought that paper was first produced in Cookham in 1624.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 28, 2008, 02:48:37 PM
Thank you Roger for your post. The Mill Lane mill was built somewhere in the early 1700's by one William Venables, or should I say that he started making paper there around then. It could have been an early grist mill prior to that. Yes, the Chinese did make paper, but so did other civilizations including the Egyptians. The Taplow and Wooburn Mills of course were producing what I would term commercial product like newsprint, while I can see the much smaller operation in Mill Lane was producing a small but high quality writing paper. Seeing that one of the family opened a Stationary business in London.
Anyway thank you once again for your interest and input.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on September 29, 2008, 06:13:11 PM
It is thought that William Venables came to the mill around 1786, as at this time it is recorded that he insured various items at the mill and rag house. He was actually a builder of mill machinery which must have been an advantage.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 29, 2008, 07:43:36 PM
Once again Roger thanks for the input: I am still pouring over other Venable material that has come to hand. One started out as a Wheel Wright, then switched to becoming a Mill Wright, when French machinery was introduced into paper making industry. This era saw a revelution in every industry, which also led to the Paper Riots as well. There are so many branches of the Venables family, the mind boggles at the complexity of it all. This is why I have to have a clear prospective of who did what and when before going to the Historical Cookham blog. I am getting help from family decendants and even they are still digging. So many books have been written about Cookham and its history, and I am afraid that a lot of authors have failed to do any in depth research, and have gone on handed down hearsay. Stephen Darby was, what I consider the last in depth author on the subject.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 30, 2008, 03:04:01 AM
Now we move away from the 1800's, to the year 1935 and Holy Trinity School once again. If you, or  perhaps your mother or father, or even your grandmother of grandfather attended school here for the first time, you will find your name listed. Only those who were registered in that year will be on that list with the date that they were enrolled.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 05, 2008, 02:46:29 AM
Some more material on Cookham has just come my way in the form of a copy of Kelly's Directory of 1895. It gives the names of the varius people living in the Parish of Cookham, which took in Cookham Village, Hedsor, Cookham Dean, Pinkneys Green, and Noth Town. The picture that goes with this part is a pen and ink sketch of Cookham weir.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on October 05, 2008, 11:19:19 AM
Morning James, going onto Holy Trinity my mother Lucy Robinson and her sister May Robinson went to the school.My Mum is in the class of 1922, unfortunately she passed away in March of this year. I went there in 1945 and my sister Heather in 1950, but by the the time my youngest sister went to school she was at  Cookham Rise which was made into a Primary School. 


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 05, 2008, 05:41:25 PM
Hullo Monty: The history of the village is getting so interesting. I am receiving so much information from decendants of villagers now dating back to the 17-1800's, from the Historical Cookham Blog.

By the way, on another subject I support your concern on the Cannondown Railway bridge, so much so I have inserted a space shot of the subject. Some think because I live on Canada's west coast, I am out of touch with the village. Far from it! You have heard of the saying: "Big Brother is watching!" Well thanks to Google Earth I get an update on what is going on every six months or so. Anyway keep the pressure on.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 05, 2008, 11:26:47 PM
Here we go and turn the clock back once more to some very facinating facts of 1895. When the pace of life was much slower. This portion of history will be added to in cronological order. It is written verbatim, so it is in the language of the day.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 07, 2008, 09:40:39 PM
For those of you who live in the high altitude of Cookham Dean. I have added a little more about the life as it was in 1895. Now posted in the "Historical Cookham Blog"


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 09, 2008, 02:05:02 PM
Now you can see who was living and working in Cookham and Cookham Rise 1895. Cookham Dean, your next on the list. To find it visit the "Historical Cookham" blog


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 09, 2008, 08:10:27 PM
Those who had relatives living Cookham Dean in 1895. The blog posting is now complete.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 10, 2008, 05:27:05 PM
We have now gone over the 3,000 mark on this posting. It is most gratifying to see so many. I am finding that a tremendous number are from outside the village, from descendants of people who once lived here, also those who are compiling family trees. Also to find that the village at one time was a hive of cottage industry, especially in the Boot & Shoe manufacture.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 17, 2008, 12:41:18 AM
Seeing there is a posting on Station Hill. I have gone back at least 108 years, to when you could walk in the middle of the road without fear of being run over.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: K.J.G. on October 17, 2008, 10:58:05 AM
You can still do that in High Road James, as most of the cars drive on the pavements.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 19, 2008, 02:26:35 AM
I know that many of you must have seen these in and around Cookham. Most likely in someones garden or along their driveway. It is the Saddle Stone or sometimes refered to as a Mushroom. It is now posted on the Historical Cookham Blog.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 23, 2008, 01:40:15 AM
We have now stepped forward in time to Wartime and the village as it was at that time some sixty-five years ago. Whist Drives were very popular with the prizes being in the form of National Savings Stamps.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on October 23, 2008, 10:10:43 PM
Thank you for your support over the railway bridge james. It is dangerous but until someone is hurt nothing will be done. I remember the Station Hill when there were just bill boards and Mrs Gibbons green grocery hut. Do you remeber that and lemon dabs at websters corn shop where Country Store is now I am sure you do.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 24, 2008, 12:41:41 AM
We did a little with the village high street in Wartime. Now I have touched on Moor Hall and Miss Freda Salberg who was the hub of a great many activities during those years of 1939 to 1945. Here I am able to cast first hand knowledge of some of the people that were there on different occasions.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 24, 2008, 08:24:31 PM
Thank you for your comments Monty. Yes I remember the little greengrocers shed on the way up the station hill. Now I remember someone who worked there for the longest time after leaving school and that was Rosa Carter, from 1. Keeley Cottages, by the Crown. The last time I saw Rosa was in Marks & Spencers in Maidenhead, where she was looking after their produce department. She mentioned that she was living in Whyteladyes Lane, married, and her married name was still Carter. Her eldest brother Brian I know has passed on. Her brother Robin was Cookham Lock Keeper for a long time. Roy a younger brother was living in Portsmouth the last I heard. There was a much younger sister Rita, but I have no idea where she is. There Mum I remember use to serve teas in Bromley's the Bakers in the High Street.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 26, 2008, 12:08:26 AM
Again we go back to the first motor cars that came to Cookham, and the story of the Kings Arms Garage. Which sad to say is no longer with us. Never the less it had quite a colourful history.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 28, 2008, 08:12:40 PM
Digging up history of Cookham has led to some very interesting finds and facts. As the young of today grow up with computers, blackberries and cell phones, so I grew up with the marvels of early radio and the wonders of direct current and DC motors. Not many people know that Guglielmo Marconi lived and experimented here in Cookham. For the full story go and visit the Historical Cookham Blog.

Lots more on analog radio and programmes coming down the line.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Megan on October 28, 2008, 10:23:20 PM
I believe Marconi's house is at the top of High Road, but not quite sure which one.   


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 28, 2008, 10:28:00 PM
Actually it is 142 Whiteladyes Lane Megan. on the corner of High Road and Whiteladyes.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Megan on October 29, 2008, 02:24:39 PM
Thank you James, I think I'll have a look at it tomorrow.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 31, 2008, 04:37:39 PM
I have just entered a picture of a very young Marconi, taken around the time when he lived in Cookham between the age of 22-24 years old. You can now compare both the little boy and the young man on the same page.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on October 31, 2008, 04:52:05 PM
Looks like he has had his hair cut.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 03, 2008, 03:08:00 PM
I am looking for a photo of Alfred (Dad) Sexton, who was verger of Holy Trinity Church during the time of the Revd B.H. Hayward-Brown. His sister acted as the vicars housekeeper. I have a story already to post in the History Blog, but I would love to have a photo to go with it.

If you have one, please contact Liz Kwantes at Cookham.com, who will I am sure pass it on to me.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 05, 2008, 12:01:08 AM
The church organ has quite a history. I have covered its early years and its dedication. Again we had someone who was famous, and those who knew him use to listen to him on the radio. Reginald Foort of the BBC was that man.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 14, 2008, 02:11:39 AM
Still in the 1930's, we now look at another form of everyday communication that was very important to all during the second world war. The family radio set and all that it meant to young and old alike. Here in this blog you get to see what the set looked like and one of the sources of power that was used in the 1930's


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 17, 2008, 08:30:02 PM
The BBC "Bandwagon" was very popular during the late 1930's. Here is the story of Arthur Askey & Richard Murdoch.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 20, 2008, 10:06:35 PM
At long last through the good services of Pam Knight I am able to finish off my story of the villages most colourful characters: The Reverend Benjamin, Huddleston Hayward-Browne as seen through the eyes of a very young boy. Better known to the village boys as "Big Ben."


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 26, 2008, 08:22:24 PM
Looking at the reported fire at Lower Mount Farm and the reported loss of chickens. Took me back to the time when a vast majority of villagers kept their own few chickens in the back garden to provide the family with a few fresh eggs and a way to recycle kitchen waste. So I have added a bit more of past Cookham life. It may come to it when you to may get back to a little backyard farming.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 30, 2008, 02:00:31 AM
I expect there are still a few in the village who will remember the Revd B.H. Hayward-Browne and his all black 1930's Humber 10 Saloon car. Well I have dug up a picture of that model to post in the history blog.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 01, 2008, 02:51:35 PM
I have just posted a story on the Alfred Major Allotments and when they started.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 04, 2008, 09:23:30 PM
Again something that happened in Cookham during the war. This time at White Place Farm.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 07, 2008, 05:23:48 PM
Now we have to travel back seventy years plus to my knowledge. To a man who did not live or work in the village and yet his work and produce was on a village kitchen table at sometime or another. Sam Gammon and his watercress were well known through this part of the Thames Valley. Though the magic of the computer age we can travel back with a photo map of what Sam's watercress beds looked like.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 08, 2008, 08:49:03 PM
Here is another wartime story that happened in Cookham accept that at the time very few knew about it, and it remained that way for the rest of the war. Now it is one of those stories that can now be told. Mind you there was enough going on else where with the army moved into St. Georges Lodge and Odney and of course Battlemeade just down the road in Maidenhead Court.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 09, 2008, 08:19:11 PM
That time of year is coming when Cookham and the Thames Valley will be concerned about flooding.
Well I have lived and survived through a good many high waters and floods. In the days when the Thames Conservancy looked after the River and Tributaries were well maintained. Even then they knew that major floods would occur.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 13, 2008, 05:51:22 PM
A MERRY HISTORICAL CHRISTMAS AND WE WILL BE BACK WITH MORE OF COOKHAM HISTORY IN THE NEW YEAR.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 17, 2008, 08:32:08 PM
JUST SAY WE HAVE ARRIVED IN RAROTONGA ON THE 15TH OF DECEMBER


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 24, 2008, 07:33:43 PM
JUST TO SAY A   MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL THE HISTORY OF COOKHAM READERS.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 01, 2009, 12:15:16 AM
A Happy New Year to one and all from where history was made in 1823.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 06, 2009, 12:20:28 AM
We will be back in action next week!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 20, 2009, 10:00:38 PM
We are back, but I am waiting on various bits of information to arrive from contributors.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 23, 2009, 05:49:07 PM
Paris brought up the subject of rabbits on Sutton Allotments. Rabbits are always a problem unless you keep them under control. So because that ground has been part of the village gardening for an historical time I have put my suggestions in the Blog.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 01, 2009, 03:43:27 PM
I am still researching village history with the aid of many good friends. Some feel that my connection with the village is remote. Well I suppose that my proven connection with the village of some 225 years gives me that slight edge over most. To understand modern day village problems, one has to understand village geography and history.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: CH on February 01, 2009, 05:25:57 PM
James, it seems like you have an awful lot to contribute.  It's a shame you aren't here in Cookham but have you thought about setting up a website similar to Cookham.com for your local area in Canada?

I'm sure there would be topics raised that you could get completely involved with and which would directly affect the community where you live in addition to your involvement here.  I'm certain they would be very grateful for a website like this too.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 01, 2009, 07:28:59 PM
Your idea CH though great has one big flaw. We are dealing in local history and geography of which it takes a life-time to gather. For my trying to start something where I have only resided here in Victoria for the past eight years is like my be an expert on those who founded the original Fort Victoria. I pay attention to those who were born and grew up here, and I talk to them every day via two metre radio.
But I would never attempt to be an historical buff here. Yes, I listen and learn something new every day. That is the way it should be for everyone. The thing is that I can sit back and look at the Cookham landscape and then form my opinions on various topics as they arise.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 05, 2009, 10:08:26 PM
The story of a one time village challenge was, to drink a "Yard of Ale". Now I doubt if you could find a Yard Glass in the village. See the History Blog.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 06, 2009, 07:04:33 PM
I have just posted a very interesting fact for those researching family history on the "Wool Act".  It may help in your reading back through village records.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 07, 2009, 05:57:56 PM
Not many people living in Cookham Dean will remember that James Mason (Actor) was once a resident of Cookham Dean. Though I expect that Gordon Harris would, as his aunt was housekeeper to the Mason family.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 08, 2009, 11:13:51 PM
Everyone I think is fully aware of Sir Stanley Spencer and his connection with Cookham. I now bring to you yet another artist whose work was viewed by millions of the travelling public. Frank Sherwin was a very quiet man who was devoted to his family and his work and is worthy of having a place in the history of Cookham.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 09, 2009, 09:55:53 PM
Again while researching the history of Cookham and Cookham Manor in particular, I came across the story of "COOKHAM MANOR 7808". It can now be viewed in the static display at Didcot.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 12, 2009, 06:54:36 PM
Here I have found something that was in use during WWII and is still can be found in use today in a modified form "THE DYNAMO TORCH."


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 16, 2009, 11:41:28 PM
We have found "Cookham Manor" Now we take a look at the old GWR Signal Box that was in use at Cookham, together with the Staff Signal Key that was carried from signal box to signal box on all single track lines by the train engine crew.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 20, 2009, 12:25:26 AM
While I am waiting for facts from several people I have now switched to some of the agricultural farm impliments of bygone years, which have slipped into the past.

The such impliment I have chosen is the Hay Knife.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 22, 2009, 09:31:40 PM
We now turn to the first farm tractor to be used in Cookham at White Place Farm. It was a International 10-20, which was imported from America by the Astor family. This unit remained ion use on the farm until the late 1950's. It relegated to sit out in all weathers at the last to cut marrow stem kale for the milking herds.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 24, 2009, 02:28:56 AM
From a tractor to a horse, or rather a pair of horses. I could have picked many shire horse breeds but I went with a pair of Belguim's that I remember well.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 24, 2009, 06:38:37 PM
We now move to a Ploughing Match of 1900 or thereabouts. Plus a drawing of what each ploughman tried to create when ploughing.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 26, 2009, 02:47:11 AM
We now move on to a bit of the farming seasons of Michaelmas and Lady Day, together with another season that happened in Cookham Dean, that of Lambing.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 28, 2009, 09:07:45 PM
One country boys pastime was catching rabbits and helping to keep the population down. So Ferrets and Nets were used. The blog now shows you how one made your own nets. Even today they can be used as a very useful shopping bag.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 01, 2009, 08:54:45 PM
Another farm hand tool that is fast disappearing is the "Billhook". This tool was in wide use in the local farms. Even professional gardenders would use them.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 03, 2009, 06:42:19 PM
Farm Labour was in many ways  were skilled not only in farming practices but, had many talents that they had picked up from working on different farms. Farming families came to work from all over the UK at White Place Farm. They would stay for a year or two and then move on. Mind you we had men who lived local in the village and the rise, then those who spent years on the farm like Ted Barrett and Neddy James. It was those who came from a far that we learned some things were done differently. This was the making of Corn Dollies and the one I was shown by Dick Atherton from Whitley Bay.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 04, 2009, 07:56:34 PM
I now go back to the year 1942 when boys were asked to collect "CONKERS" and bring them to the school to aid the war effort. We were told that it was to make a wonder toohpaste that would prevent cavities. Now the true story can be told.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Pongo on March 05, 2009, 10:46:11 AM
The game of conkers is frowned on now I am afraid James, Health and Safety have taken over this country. There are still ploughing matches yearly though near White Place Farm.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Richard on March 05, 2009, 12:36:04 PM
Conkers is alive and well at the Cookham Cubs where my son has participated in many an organised contest (allbeit only after donning protective eyewear)!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 05, 2009, 02:55:32 PM
Thanks for the posting Pongo & Richard. Tell me, does Health and Safety issue every family with free cotton wool to wrap your children in? Is it mandatory that they wear leg protectors, just in case they should be stung by the lowly Stinging Nettle?

Here is an old Conker Chant:

Iddy, iddy, onker my first Conker. Iddy, iddy, oh my first go.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Richard on March 05, 2009, 03:54:19 PM
Close, James, very close...


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 05, 2009, 06:29:31 PM
My research into early Cookham and Home Counties life style and ways has been paying off in spades. I have found what is the first mechanical piece of haymaking machinery. Though the two horse mower came on the scene around the same time. The trip mechanizm was again was by a series of cogs and a foot operated pedal.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 06, 2009, 02:06:45 AM
Another farming trade which was as numerous as the Blacksmith for the horses that needed to be shod on the farm. Was the traveling harness repair man and in this blog is one of the tools that carried with him.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 08, 2009, 06:50:11 PM
I have just been given permission to print facts on the Bamford Hay Making equipment from their archive source. Here is the story of the Hay Tedder one of which I remember being used by White Place Farm in the 1930's and 40's.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Bagheera on March 08, 2009, 10:17:38 PM
On health and safety have a look at http://www.hse.gov.uk/myth/index.htm (http://www.hse.gov.uk/myth/index.htm)  and in particular http://www.hse.gov.uk/myth/september.htm (http://www.hse.gov.uk/myth/september.htm)

Much of the time it is more about the risk of being sued and what insurers will allow than what the HSE says.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 08, 2009, 11:56:51 PM
Thanks for the site Bagheera, as I said earlier. Is the government issuing cottonwool these days to wrap the children in? Next it will someone suing the council for laying tarmac, and the child who fell over and scraped their knee. Where will it all end!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 09, 2009, 01:29:21 AM
Now back to History. The Whippletree is a piece of farm equiipment that would have been found on every farm in Cookham and the Dean. In later years I have seen these hanging in local pubs as a decoration, so here it is as part of village history.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 09, 2009, 08:17:37 PM
We now jump back in time to Cookham in 1942. A lot of houses that exist today did not exist at all and included in that group is "Westwood Green" Yes in 1942 Westwood Green was a field of maincrop potatoes. For more you have to view the blog:

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 11, 2009, 12:01:50 AM
I have been going back through an old Windows 98 computer today and have come up with a lot of good photos both old and new of the Cookhams. A lot of which will come up in later posts. Today I found not a very old photo, but it certainly is a piece of Cookham Dean history. This is the story of a lunch my family and I had there.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 11, 2009, 05:55:05 PM
Now with fresh photographs we step back some 69 years in Village life and to the Dad Sexton Choirboys club with some of it's members present in front of the War Memorial. Three of the boys are wearing there First Aid pouches on their belts, as Dad Sexton was a keen First Aider, having served in the Australian Army Medical Corp during the First World War.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 12, 2009, 11:42:56 PM
My files have turned up this photo of a very young Sir Stanley Spencer when he was in the R.A.M.C. attached to an ambulance unit. My references make him to be about 24 when this photograph was taken.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 16, 2009, 05:19:28 PM
I have noted that in the past, some refer to the youth of today as SHAV'S. Well I is sad to think that they were once young as well! Here I have taken a step back some sixty years and to my first car. Nothing flashy, but I did get a whole lot of fun out of owing it.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 19, 2009, 08:53:25 PM
Another piece of farm equipment that use to travel up and down Cookham High Street. The two wheeled horse and cart. Which had a very long village history.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 22, 2009, 07:26:49 PM
Today folks living in and visitors to Cookham have got use to the sophisticated equipment and prognosis that comes from Bracknell for their daily weather. A 100 years ago they relied on the forecast given by my grandfather, as they called in at Oveys Farm.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 24, 2009, 06:36:31 PM
Now back to wartime Cookham. Remember earlier I did mention about Westwood Green being a field of potatoes in 1942. Well here is a picture that I was sent of a scene of two boys picking spuds, though it does not look like Cookham or anyone that I remember. Mind you we did have a lot of childen from London staying with us in those days.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 04, 2009, 07:27:27 PM
To round out the story of the local Cookham potato harvesting I have found a photo of a Bamford unit, which of course are pretty well extinct on the modern day farming operation as they are very labour intensive. You may find one in a small pick your own operation, as they are quite easy to maintain.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 05, 2009, 06:05:13 PM
This again is to help Jabber with the question on the Toll Bridge Cottage. At least there is a photo of the cottage, so those who are not familiar with the village have some idea of what is being discussed.

More on the bridge itself will come later.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 08, 2009, 12:04:28 AM
Digging a little further, and I still have more to research to cover on the Cookham Bridge and the Thames itself, which has had in the past has added so much to the past life in the village. I have started with the bridge fenders and why they were so situated. With reflection on the tug and barge traffic on the river.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 09, 2009, 02:34:14 PM
There was a time when a housewife was judged by other housewives how well she kept her house by the colour of her wash on wash days. For years the following clothes pins or pegs were the only thing that was used. Of course today most of it is hidden in the tumble drier!

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 09, 2009, 09:43:44 PM
Reading the postings over the past months by The Thames Valley Police. Got me thinking back to the 1930's and 40's in the village, and of course the village Bobby and his bicycle. So here is a bit of a flash back to those days.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on April 10, 2009, 10:00:44 AM
James, you will be pleased to hear that the Parish Council purchased a bicycle for Cookham's local Bobby a while back. Our one Cookham Bobby now covers a huge area including Hurley and Burchetts Green, although he has help from some PCSOs.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 10, 2009, 02:54:17 PM
Thank you for the information Roger. Is it one of those super-duper mountain bikes? He would need it to make a dash from the Olde Bell at Hurley to an incident in Cookham. My word that is progress! Maybe there should be a hill climb contest on mountain bikes for the TVPF up through Quarry Woods. That would certainly draw a good crowd.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 12, 2009, 01:12:04 AM
We now switch to a country sport that has been around for years, and as you will see by my photo that the Eton College Beagle Pack is still going strong. Yes hunting with dogs has been around for a long time. Even Cookham Dean was a home ti a Staghound Pack. Hence the name Kennel Lane.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on April 12, 2009, 03:36:32 PM
Beagles are the dog breed most often used in animal testing, due to their size and passive nature. Of the 8,018 dogs used in testing in the UK in 2004, 7,799 were Beagles (97.3%).[60] In the UK, the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 gave special status to primates, equids, cats and dogs and in 2005 the Animal Procedures Committee (set up by the act) ruled that testing on mice was preferable, even though a greater number of individual animals were involved.[61] In 2005 Beagles were involved in less than 0.3% of the total experiments on animals in the UK, but of the 7670 experiments performed on dogs 7406 involved Beagles (96.6%).[62] Most dogs are bred specifically for the purpose, by companies such as Harlan. In the UK companies breeding animals for research must be licensed under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 12, 2009, 04:02:11 PM
So Wannabe, are Rats, Mice, and Goats. So what has that got to do with history, and what the Beagle was originally bred for.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 13, 2009, 06:19:48 PM
This next blog I felt I had to write in support of those concerned villagers on the state of the River Thames, and its banks and towpaths. There aws a time when The Thames Conservancy meant conservation and were very much into Preventative Maintenance.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on April 13, 2009, 07:21:14 PM
So Wannabe, are Rats, Mice, and Goats. So what has that got to do with history, and what the Beagle was originally bred for.
James, since when has relevance to the topic stopped you from posting your opinions or comments?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 13, 2009, 08:51:16 PM
Because my dear Simes the one thing that you all overlook. I and my family have had a long association with the village. That is fact that you can't dispute. That is whyI care.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on April 13, 2009, 09:11:54 PM
James, it's good to hear that your family have long associations with the village, but does that give you the right to post responses that are not relevant to the topic? Your history & food blogs are no doubt interesting to many of the people who visit Cookham.com & you have threads running that direct people to them, I don't think it's appropriate that you then try to hijack other threads as well.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 13, 2009, 11:48:48 PM
I am not hi-jacking the threads as you say. I am concerned that the village is losing its identity, what with the pressure of more housing estates and the like. I am trying to protect the heritage of the Cookham's.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Whitburn on April 14, 2009, 08:54:33 AM
I'm with you Simes and most of the other posters on here. Hijacker Hatch has a good ring to it.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on April 14, 2009, 09:08:06 PM
Spellin James! Please ask her indoors before posting!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 14, 2009, 09:24:10 PM
Spelling has a "G" on the end mate!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on April 14, 2009, 10:36:47 PM
Mine was intentional, I see you edited yours..........


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on April 15, 2009, 08:07:55 AM
I am not hi-jacking the threads as you say.... I am trying to protect the heritage of the Cookham's.
Sorry James, but I fail to see how directing people to your grilled halibut or Yinnie Lin's Stir Fried Veg recipes when we're having a good discussion on the pros & cons of local restaurants is going to protect the heritage of Cookham.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Bertie on April 15, 2009, 08:08:34 AM
Now with fresh photographs we step back some 69 years in Village life and to the Dad Sexton Choirboys club with some of it's members present in front of the War Memorial. Three of the boys are wearing there First Aid pouches on their belts, as Dad Sexton was a keen Fist Aider, having served in the Australian Army Medical Corp during the First World War.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com
'There...pouches?'
'Fist Aider?'   :o
Ah the wonder of spellcheckers- no accounting for grammar or punctuation....or spelling sometimes!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on April 15, 2009, 01:41:35 PM
You would think that someone who's so keen to point out others' spelling mistakes and grammatical errors would at least check their own posts!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: CH on April 15, 2009, 01:51:58 PM
Come on people, be nice.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 15, 2009, 02:42:30 PM
Thanks CH. All authors know they should never proof read there own work. This case was a typo as my fingers can not keep up with the speed of my thoughts. Mind you there is a quotation "Little things please little minds -----." Of course you will remember the rest.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on April 15, 2009, 02:59:47 PM
James Hatch is the first person to point out other people's spelling or grammatical errors which, therefore, makes him open for ridicule or criticism when he himself makes mistakes. Seems that everyone else on the site gets on just fine & respects each other's opinions.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 16, 2009, 11:08:24 PM
Cookham's  Peter Stubberfield was to Motor Hill Climb Racing as Sir Stirling Moss was to the Formula V500 Cooper and Formula 1 Grande Prix racing world. In a note that I received from Sir Stirling, he said that at that time of hill racing at Prescott quoting “That we were at that time, in different classes, and Peter was winning all the trophies.”


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on April 17, 2009, 08:02:31 PM
I think he's overheating! :o


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 20, 2009, 11:01:32 PM
Now to get away from Motor Hill Climb Racing, I have gone back to gather information on Cookham as a Royal Manor. What is posted is only part of what there is known. I have found some conflicting dates, and those in error will be corrected if and when I have proof. The passage on the Hayward's I do know as fact as I did know men personally.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 22, 2009, 10:19:40 PM
With thanks to Paul Gibbons of the Bugatti Owners Club we now have a photograph of Peter Stubberfield chatting with friends at a Hill Climb meet.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 25, 2009, 02:10:35 AM
This is a photo taken at a village Christmas Party for Evacuees in 1939. I wonder how many of these children now are Grand Parents in 2009.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 27, 2009, 02:32:18 PM
If anyone is wondering why GOOGLE is in Morse Code today, it is to celebrate Marconi's Birthday.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on April 27, 2009, 06:30:30 PM
 ::) They're a bit late, he was born on 25 April 2 days before Samuel Morse.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on April 28, 2009, 11:11:18 PM
Cat got your mouse? ;)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 29, 2009, 06:49:33 PM
A little more of Cookham and its past has come my way. The story of Frederick Walker who was quite a talanted man, only to die at the age of 35.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Archimedes on April 29, 2009, 07:45:08 PM
There was a talk about Fred Walker as part of the Cookham Festival and there is also an exhibition of some of his works at the Parish Centre. http://www.cookham.com/cookhamfestival/news/fredwalker/fredwaller.htm (http://www.cookham.com/cookhamfestival/news/fredwalker/fredwaller.htm)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 30, 2009, 11:29:57 PM
It seems that two of us have been working on Fred Walker at the same time. I have been dabbling in and around the subject for quite awhile along with other people who have lived or visited the village over the years. The next item is on Fred's most famous oil painting "The Bathers".


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 02, 2009, 05:08:34 PM
This time we switch to Frederick Walker and his woodcut prints and picture of a Goose Girl driving geese down Cookham High Street. The closest I ever came to woodcut prints was in "LINO", under the instruction of my old Hesd Master, Mr. G.H. Wood.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 05, 2009, 05:00:36 PM
Walker woodcuts were quite prolific. Here is one that was published in "Punch."

I am also sorry if you missed the Walker Exhibition in the Parish Centre, which ended on the 4th of May. I you will be able to catch up with what you missed and maybe a bit more here in this Blog.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 07, 2009, 12:07:09 AM
We have now come to the final resting place of Frederick Walker in Cookham Churchyard. I still have a few more of his works to display when I have the accompanying data.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 08, 2009, 02:26:24 AM
Still with the story of Frederick Walker, we arrive at his home of East Flint, which still stands in the village High Street. Plus stories of the building on either side at later dates.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Down The Hatch on May 08, 2009, 08:59:26 AM
Jim, Do you know anything about the history of Berries Road?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 08, 2009, 03:44:57 PM
Berries Road: Well there is one person who lived there, and that was Mrs. Kate Bird. Also one of my school teachers Mrs. Snapes. Her husband was gardener for Mrs. Bird. The Sharman-Wrights lived there, also an old friend of mine Neal Ratee. I will be getting around to various roads and families in due course.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 09, 2009, 12:36:44 AM
I have still a little more on Frederick Walker. I now have a photo of the Walker memorial plaque which is on the wall in Holy Trinity Church. This with the earlier sketch of it will give a chance to compare.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 09, 2009, 05:40:49 PM
William Makepeace Thackeray and the Cornhill Magazine found a home for a great many of Frederick Walker's woodcut prints. In this one Philip at Prayer was what you may call a serial on the adventures of Philip.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 11, 2009, 05:55:12 PM
We now get a chance to meet Frederick Walker's artist friend John William North. "Old North" Walker use to call him, although he was two yeas older than his friend and critic. North died in 1924.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 13, 2009, 11:15:20 PM
We now move on to another artist in the village, in the person of Tom Emmett the village Blacksmith.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 16, 2009, 03:16:32 PM
We now move on to a fine example of Tom Emmett's craftmanship of a wrought iron gate. People pass it everyday, without giving it a thought to the skill of the man who made it.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 20, 2009, 01:09:45 AM
There are very few people living in the village today, know that a very famous Admiral of the Fleet chose the Parish of Cookham for he and his sister in retirement. Admiral of the Fleet Rt Hon Sir Edward Hobart Seynour. This is his story is all it's colour and adventure.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 20, 2009, 05:40:23 PM
I have discovered a map of Europe and North Africa, showing land bridges. The date may be out, but the facts are right. You will find it attached to the Blog dated the 15th of September 2008.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: cookhamjames on May 21, 2009, 03:06:49 PM
I take in and let out a deep audible breath of weariness.

I would say that its got nothing to do with Cookham. But I’d be wasting my time, as myself and many others have said it 10 times before.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on May 21, 2009, 08:55:20 PM
Perfectly said Cookhamjames. No doubt the faithful few will come to the defence of Mr Hatch yet again but this is Cookham.com, not mapofeurope.com, & I visit this site to discuss & learn about Cookham.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 23, 2009, 02:17:42 AM
This is the little church of St. Mary's Kinwarton, where Sir Edward spent his formative years, with some of his brothers and sisters.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 23, 2009, 08:42:36 PM
Moving on with the Seymour story and his basic education at Radley Hall near Abingdon. He was a scholar until he was twelve.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 24, 2009, 06:31:31 PM
Little or nothing was written on young Seymour's life at the Portsmouth Naval College, except that he graduated as Midshipman at the age of 14 and was posted to a steam driven paddle wheel frigate in 1854. See the latest Blog.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 27, 2009, 12:41:12 AM
Edward Seymour's life in the junior ranks seem to be rather thin, and it is hard to match up his rank and the ships that he was serving on.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on May 27, 2009, 08:59:55 PM
The first paddle steamer was the Pyroscaphe built by Marquis Claude de Jouffroy of Lyon in France, in 1783. It had a horizontal double-acting steam engine driving two 13.1-ft (4 m) paddle wheels on the sides of the craft. On July 15 1783 it steamed successfully up the Saône for fifteen minutes before the engine failed. Political events interrupted further development. That didn't have much to do with Cookham either.



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 28, 2009, 01:54:12 AM
Again we follow the threads of Seymour's career right up to his promotion to that of Vice-Admiral and his command of the China Station and the Boxer Rebellion and his lead in the relief of Peking.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on May 28, 2009, 08:19:17 AM
Peking Inn (Cookham) Ltd
49 High Street
Cookham
Maidenhead
Berks SL6 9SL
Tel: 01628 520900 | Fax: 01628 527722

http://www.pekinginncookham.co.uk/ (http://www.pekinginncookham.co.uk/)

A favorite, and something that is really about Cookham.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 28, 2009, 09:13:55 PM
Embedded in the Admial's Coat of Arms there is quite a lot of his naval exploits including his many decorations and medals. He was the last surviving holder of the Victorian Order of Merit.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on May 28, 2009, 09:42:12 PM
Imbedded (Embedded)  in the Admial's (Admiral's) Coat of Arms there is (are?)  quite a lot of his naval exploits including his many decorations and medals. He was the last surviving holder of the Victorian Order of Merit.
 ;)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on May 29, 2009, 07:57:16 AM
Ha ha! Thanks wannabe, at least this irrelevant post now has correct spelling!!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: wannabe on May 29, 2009, 08:46:04 AM
From where does the phrase "down the hatch" originate?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 30, 2009, 01:59:17 AM
The Seymour Memorial Plaque is sited on the south wall of Holy Trinity Church.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on May 31, 2009, 05:03:26 PM
Admiral Seymore is buried in Cookham Cemetery in Long Lane,
brillo


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 01, 2009, 01:48:26 AM
We now pay reference to someone everyone knows, but also a few not so well known facts thrown in on Kenneth Grahame and his son "Mouse".


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 02, 2009, 02:58:05 AM
I have received information as to where Admiral Seymour and his sister lived in Maidenhead Court. Who knows I wonder that they are living in the same house, as of course it is all built up there now, from the way it was in the 1930 and 40's.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 06, 2009, 10:41:04 PM
Thanks to many people supplying me with Historical facts. I have several storys on the go. One is about a village resident who was known as "The African Violet Man."


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 07, 2009, 05:53:34 PM
Now back to Historical Cookham and the people of the past who made it tick. The village has been a haven for artists, and still is today. Frederick Walker who we have already discussed was the expert in Woodcut prints, for example "The Goose Girl". Now I am about to introduce another well known local artist, whose expertise was with the Scraperboard. A technique that was introduced to the art world between the two world wars


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 09, 2009, 11:11:12 PM
To finish the Story of Peter Stubberfield, I have included a Google shot of where he use to live while he was living in Cookham.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 11, 2009, 10:32:03 PM
After much research and help from this gentlemans daughter I am now ready to bring you the story of Sidney Jewell. There are many of the older village residents who will remember him well. So in a way this is a little modern history brought to life.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 12, 2009, 11:35:32 PM
Another addition to the Sidney Thomas Jewel story. Once again thank you to Diana for this colourful information.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 15, 2009, 07:20:14 PM
Mrs. Joan Jewell, Sidney's wife was evacuated to Cookham soon after their first child a baby girl "Chritine"was born and came to live with Miss Dixon on the Lower Road.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 16, 2009, 06:09:17 PM
The arrival of the Jewell family to set up a permament home was in 1947. This is when they took on village life to the full in their High Road home.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 18, 2009, 11:41:49 PM
Watercolour art of Sidney Jewell became something of a retirement pleasure. The painting here shows forth his technical painting skills of the Old Forge Garage.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 23, 2009, 07:47:57 PM
Once again another Sidney Jewell watercolour landscape of Cock Marsh, with a little more about the man himself.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 24, 2009, 07:58:14 PM
This has to be the best watercolour I have ever seen of Quarry Woods. A very fine example by Sidney Jewell.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 27, 2009, 12:49:06 AM
We now have arrived at the end of the story of Sidney Jewell. For which I give thanks to his youngest daughter Diana for all her help in so many ways.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 30, 2009, 11:38:30 PM
Gilbert Spencer, Stanley's younger brother now gets my attention, as there is never enough ever revealed that Stanley ever had a brother, who both received training from the same tutors at the Slade.

To get away from his brothers shadow Gilbert also took up the profession of being an art teacher. Working away from Cookham for a great deal of the time.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 04, 2009, 07:39:22 PM
Another early Gilbert Spencer work called "The Village Flower Show." The setting is mythical, but some of the artist's childhood is brought to the fore.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 07, 2009, 12:09:09 AM
This next painting of Gilbert Spencer, is of the Moor looking towards the village and it has two landmarks that no longer exist: 1. The old Crown Hotel before it was burnt down. 2. The track leading to the Honour small holding in Marsh Meadow.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 07, 2009, 08:46:55 PM
This is the only other painting of Gilbert Spencer that I can atribute to Cookham. It is a very detailed landscape of Sashes Island with sheep in the distance.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 09, 2009, 11:21:14 PM
We now move with Gilbert Spencer to Dorset, a county where he completed a lot of his landscapes. It was also an attraction to Hardy and Betjeman.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 12, 2009, 01:51:59 AM
Little more on the Gilbert Spencer travels.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 14, 2009, 12:26:07 AM
During the war Gilbert Spencer and his family were evacuated along with the Royal Accadamy of Art from London to Ambleside in Cumbria. He was a tutor and also did warwork for the government as well.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 15, 2009, 11:42:06 PM
Gilbert Spencer did quite a few pencil and paper drawings and I have brought a few of them for you to look at. As a matter of fact there use to be a Gilbert Spencer pencil sketch hanging in the  ringing chamber of Holy Trinity, just to the right of the window and just above the bench. It was given to Thomas John Fowler by Gilbert sometime in the mid 1930's.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 20, 2009, 03:13:32 AM
Towards the end of his very active teaching career Gilbert Spencer moved to Upper Basildon from the bustle of life in Hampstead.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 22, 2009, 10:17:17 PM
Thes last two entries on Gilbert Spencer brings to all that I have on the man and his life under the shadow of a famous brother. I am sure that there must be a great many students of his that benefitted from his lectures at the various Art Colleges.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 27, 2009, 02:12:48 AM
This was not on my immediate list to add to this Blog, but the new that the Fire Station was to close due to the lack of local volunteer members. Past members would be very dissapointed if this happens as they were a very efficient and happy team. If it does close, I hope you will realise that your fire insurance on your homes will rise due to the increase in risk.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 29, 2009, 08:57:14 PM
Now we move into the colourful history of Sir Roger with a photo of the same model, with a few of my touch up's to recall its looks.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Blossom on July 29, 2009, 09:51:04 PM
Does anyone have information on the connection between my house (part of Cliveden View) on Sutton Road, opposite White Place Farm and Cliveden?  I know the house was originally part of the Cliveden Estate but I would love to know more about who it was built for.  Any recommendations of resources from the Cookham historians or knowledgable locals would be gratefully received.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 29, 2009, 10:21:23 PM
Hi Blossom: Yes your home of Cliveden View was for as long as I remember the home of a Mr. & Mrs. Bertie Browne. The fields and the farm were part of Widbrook Farm that was purchased by the Astor's when they came to live at Cliveden. Widbrook House was the home of Col. & Mrs Sadler all pre war. The garage at the bottom of your garden was were Bertie Browne kept his Rolls. In later years it was the home of Peter Stubberfield.
In the late 1940's your home was the Weils family who were South African. Then it change hands after that, but I left the village in the 1950's.

Hope this helps you Blossom?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Pam on July 30, 2009, 09:35:50 AM
James,

I think we can probably attribute another of Gilbert's paintings to Cookham: The Village Allotments. These appear to be the allotments on the Alfred Major recreation ground, with the view beyond as it would have looked before the Cannon Bridge Estate was built after WW2.

This shows (from left to right) the old line of the Switchback Road marked by the hedge, the wood at Cannon Court Farm, the long copse known as Windmill Shaw (now gone) and the woods beyond Long Lane, close to the road to Pinkneys Green. The wood on the right is at Harwoods, the highest point in the area.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Archimedes on July 30, 2009, 10:20:23 AM
I remember Tony and Mishtu Bevins lived at 2 Cliveden View until their untimely death about eight years ago. Tony was a lobbyist and first political editor of the Independent and a great friend of Andrew Marr. His father was Reginald Bevins who was Post Master General for the Conservatives. In Widbrook House Sarah-Jane Roper lived (Chairman of the Cookham Society at the latter part of the 1990s) whose father was Francis Pym, I believe, one of the Maggie Thatcher "wets". Interestingly enough another Cookhamite, Sir George Young MP was also considered a wet.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 30, 2009, 10:53:08 PM
Very interesting Archimedes. People seem to pop in and out of the village with quite colourful backgrounds.

Pam: I have taken another look at Gilbert's painting, and I can see what you are aiming at except that the row of six trees in the middle foreground does not fit with I see in the frame. I also think that the gas holders would have come into the picture. Mind you he did a lot of work from memory and the odd sketch. Shall we artistic licence!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 01, 2009, 12:44:11 AM
Today is a milestone in the search for village history. Yes the Village historical blog as been going now for a year. Actually the idea in the middle of July 2008, and the first blog was written and posted on the 1st of August. At this point I wish to thank all those who have helped and wished to remain behind the scenes. There has also been a great many, who have been looking back to trace what they can find about their ancestors. Way over sixteen and a half thousand have visited the blog via the Discussion Page a great many have come direct due to the publicity by Google. I still am looking for more to add in the future, sadly there are very few of my generation who have been fortunate enough to have mastered the computer, so here is a chance for their children and grand children to capture all the valuable information so that it can be recorded for posterity. Anyway, I have not run out as yet.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 03, 2009, 09:20:49 PM
Here is an example of what made dear old "Sir Roger" tick. As it was lovingly cared for by Fred Robinson.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 04, 2009, 03:28:15 PM
Thanks Jabber. It may have been broken up into spare parts, or it could be sitting as a static display somewhere. If it is no longer used on the highway, it no longer need be taxed and would not show on the books. Still there is hope that it will turn up one day. Not every piece of equipment such as this ran for so long and did such yeoman service to the village and country.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on August 04, 2009, 07:06:56 PM
Quote
If it is no longer used on the highway, it no longer need be taxed and would not show on the books.

Not quite true any more I am afraid James. The government have produced something called SORN (Statutory Off Road Notification).


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 04, 2009, 09:13:28 PM
Do you know Roger! The government only do this to keep Civil Servants employed! Still I hope someone who reads this Blog and has an interest in antique fire engines, who knows where it is today. As for SORN, well can you imagine the powers that be going to a static display and putting a clamp on!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 07, 2009, 02:44:22 AM
It is hard to explain sometimes when no hard how you try to find an old photo of a piece of wartime fire fighting equipment, so you have to conjour something up! The static EWS emergency water supply was a good stand by if the hydrants were damaged. Cookham had two portable canvas models that they could put up anywhere the need arose. Again I could find no pictures of those canvas tanks.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 09, 2009, 11:26:54 PM
I have been fortunate to come across two more photos that are representative of the Sir Roger fire engine.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 12, 2009, 09:22:22 PM
The Coventry Climax "Godiva" firefighting trailer pump was a great asset to the village during World War II, especially when the Sir Roger fire engine was away during the Blitz.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on August 15, 2009, 11:10:05 AM
In the late 1960s the Cookham appliance was a Carmichael/ Comma Water Tender reg no FRX 322, It was fitted with a Godiva 500 gpm pump and carried 400 galons of water in its tank.
The ladder carried on the roof was a 35ft Wooden Bailey.
This appliance was replaced in 1970 by a brand new Carmichael/ Comma "Gamecock" the first part of the reg no was WJB cannot remember the rest this was also fitted with a 500gpm Godiva pump, carried 400 gallons of water, and a Home Office pattern metal 35ft ladder. This appliance was the first brand new appliance to be stationed at Cookham

Carmicheal were a well known fire appliance body builders based in Worcester.

The Sub Officers in charge at Cookham from 1950 to 2000 were,

Alf Mathews, Charlie Webb, John Lester, Brian Nickolls, Mervyn Dodds.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 15, 2009, 06:23:16 PM
Very interesting Brillo.  Yes, I a remember Alf Matthews very well indeed as a very long serving member of the brigade.  Charlie Webb I remember as a brother of John Webb with whom I went to school with.  Tell me if I am right, wasn't Mervyn Dodds the son of Harry and the brother of Betty?  Another long serving member of the brigade was Dennis Cook, who was a very entertaining member.  He always had a joke to tell to make everyone laugh. 


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 16, 2009, 09:59:20 PM
After reading Brillo's message the other day, I got to thinking about the two young ladies who served in the Cookham Fire Brigade during the war period.  Except for two people that I know whose aunts they were, I don't suppose there are very many people who would remember them in the persons of Jesse and Joan Tubb.  Those young ladies worked some very long hours in the fire station, doing the paperwork and answering telephone calls.  These two I am glad to say, that I have been very proud to have known.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 18, 2009, 09:06:46 PM
The little Stirup Pump was the local first-line of defence against incendiary bomb attacks during World War II.  Cookham Arminian witnessed one incendiary bomb attack during the war, and most of those fell in farm fields or on Widbrook Common.  Firemen came out with good also Sir Roger and most of the fires were extinguished by shovelling soil over the burning incendiary bomb.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 23, 2009, 03:14:39 AM
We now dive back to the late 1800's and early 1900's taking in the operation of Widbrook Common and the grazing of cattle and horses.  I am dealing only with a small part of the operation and the history of what happened.  More to come in another blog.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 26, 2009, 12:14:33 AM
Once again we carry on with the history of Widbrook Common and the Sutton Road and, what it was like to travel there in the middle ages to late 1800's.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on August 26, 2009, 09:47:46 AM
The Sir Roger fire engine was originaly owned by the Maidenhead Fire Brigade and was purchased by Cookham whan Maidenhead replaced it with a newer model.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 26, 2009, 02:58:10 PM
Thanks Brillo for the tip. Can you post your source of information, so it may be comfirmed.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on August 28, 2009, 07:07:50 PM
Maidenhead Borough Council records Maidenhead Library

brillo


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on August 28, 2009, 08:07:42 PM
Fred Robinson was my grandfather and I knew all of the firmen mentioned. It is dreadful that they are closing the station.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 28, 2009, 08:17:58 PM
Thank you Brillo, as I like to know where my information comes from.

Hullo Monty nice to nice to hear from you my dear. I think that the closure is a very sad case indeed. It reminds me if what Beeching did with the country's rail network and now we are living to regret it. It shows you how blind some politians are. You and I know also what village esprit-de-corp our village firemen and others had in years gone by.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 28, 2009, 10:27:09 PM
Carrying on with the Sutton Road and Widbrook Common saga, we now come to the building of the original bridge. As a young boy many a time have I navigated some sort of homemade boat or craft through the bridge. As a matter of fact the original coal gas line from the Taplow Works went over the Eastern side of the bridge. I remember Len Fenner who worked for the gas works use to come and pump the water seepage out of the line periodically. He also collected money from the shilling gas meter we had, from which my Mother always got a rebate! When the telephone lines were taken down the cable were laid in a brick condute under the Western side of the bridge.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 31, 2009, 11:13:34 PM
I have decided at this point in giving you some past features and uses of Widbrook Common. Times have changed of course, but I am sticking with history of what was there in the early 1900's. Some items of historical interest such as the Branding Irons and Tar Pot were kept by the late Jim Ricketts, who was a great preserver of village historical agricultural past, and should now be preserved.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 04, 2009, 01:04:54 AM
In the main the fencing of Widbrook Common was constructed from local materials and labour. Only a few items had to be purchased elsewhere. The Harding's team as I nremember were at least four and sometimes six men, depending on the scope of the work required and the speed to complete.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 05, 2009, 09:11:30 PM
The building of many country B Class roads, of which Sutton Road was at one time, were all hand built as there was little or no mechanical equipment available, except for the odd steam shovel or excavator.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Karen on September 06, 2009, 08:08:08 PM
Ok. This will have nothing to do with fences at all but hoping someone can help me with my quest!

My grandmother was Mrs Ethel Evans who was a teacher at Holy Trinity School for about 28years retiring in 1944. The school have provided me with relevant entries in the daily record book - ie "Mrs Evans was late arriving to school today as she had a flat tyre on her bicycle". She lived in Switchback Road. I have found the Historical Cookham Blog and was interested to see the Holy Trinity information. I have some photos of my grandmother and the pupils but dated earlier than 1935! I would love to hear from someone who knew her.
Karen


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: K.J.G. on September 06, 2009, 09:11:58 PM
Karen : I am sure Mr. Hatch will have something to say on the subject  ;D

             Regards K.J.G.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 06, 2009, 09:51:19 PM
Karen my dear! What a lovely surprise that you are the grand daughter of dear Mrs. Evans, she was a very lovely lady, very kind and caring person. She not only taught me how to print and read, but also handycrafts as well. I would love a picture of her to add to my History Blog. Yes I can remember her house on the Switchback Road in Furze Platt almost oposite Jack Exler's garage.





Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 09, 2009, 09:28:54 PM
Now we come to the bi-annual maintenance of the roads around Cookham and the Sutton Road in particular. I could not find some archived photos of some of the equipment and I expect that a lot of them have long since hit the scrap heap.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 12, 2009, 10:56:51 PM
Traffice Surveys of the 1930's and 40's were somewhat different than today, but may have been just accurate, except maybe for speed surveillance.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Archimedes on September 13, 2009, 12:11:40 PM
I haven't seen a traffic survey for ages. Do they still do them? I have seen lots of those cables they lay across the road though.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 13, 2009, 03:44:34 PM
Yes highways now rely those pneumatic pressure cables to record the information, then of course you need a code breaking cypher computer to define the type of traffic and density. With a double cable layout you can now obtain speed plus direction. Survey equipment looks inocent enough, but it gives highways and the police a lot of information 24-7.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 17, 2009, 12:53:52 AM
We now move to to a family that was quite influential in Cookham life over a 60-70 year period, and the changes that they brought with them in more ways than one. Some will say what has the Astor family got to do with Cookham. To tell this story we have to go back to New York and what spurred William Waldorf the 1st Viscount Astor to leave America and settle and make his home in Britain.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 20, 2009, 03:54:29 AM
Waldorf William the 2nd Viscount Astor and his wife Lady Nancy Astor I got to know quite well in the late 1930s and 1940s.  This section is devoted to the life of his Lordship, more of the life and work of Lady Astor will appear later.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 23, 2009, 01:18:24 AM
So much has already been written about Lady Astor and her childhood with her 4 sisters and 3 brothers. I wanted to draw to your attention that her father was a hard drinking tyrant, and had no respect for women in general except to serve his needs. This rubbed off on Nancy, with her brusk manner and her feelings against drink. Plus I wanted to bring to light the Lady Astor that I knew.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 27, 2009, 01:08:23 AM
We now get into 1906 and the time when Waldorf and Nancy took over Cliveden house and the estate, plus the remodelling of White Place Farm with the importation of material and equipment from North America.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 30, 2009, 10:35:05 PM
We now move on to when Waldorf Astor became member of parliament for Plymouth Sutton and the events that took place in and around that time. You will find that I will be going backward and forwards in time as I cover various changes and the particular subject. Here I bring in the first Canadian Red Cross hospital of 1914-1918 war and the wargrave site in particular


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 03, 2009, 07:59:35 PM
We now leave Cliveden for a while and turn our attention to White Place Farm as it used to be and as I remember it in the 1930s and 40s when it was a very active and up to date model farm producing milk of extraordinary TT qualities, for not only the local schools but for some of the London County Council schools as well on a daily basis.  Of course to run this farm it required a very large staff as it was very labour-intensive, at one time there were over 50 people employed in its running.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 04, 2009, 12:57:31 AM
Just keep an eye out folks somebodies grandfather may turn up the story of White Place.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 07, 2009, 09:26:11 PM
In growing up and through life I have always kept an eye open to the skills that people perform in their various professions. The Rick builder, whether it be Hay or Corn was always interesting to watch.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 11, 2009, 02:55:05 AM
Before I get too far away from the Staddle Stones, I thought I would mention that there was a Wooden Granary on Staddle Stones at Sutton Farm, which of course was part of the White Place Farm unit.  I will be returning at a future date to discuss and describe more about Sutton Farm.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 13, 2009, 08:53:15 PM
We now move on to item two on the White Place Farm layout of years gone by and the two Dutch barns that once stood in the farmyard. There will be a second phase to this story as I go into construction and the history of Dutch barns in greater detail.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 15, 2009, 11:26:39 PM
As I mentioned in the last blog I have turned to the history of Corrugated Galvanized Iron and its use in the development of the Dutch Barn and other farm buildings.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 19, 2009, 07:39:35 PM
Time to refer to the farm map once more as I discuss buildings 3,4, and five and their uses in the farms heyday.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 22, 2009, 10:18:43 PM
George Ernest Hughes is someone from my childhood that I remember well from my knowledge of White Place Farm. His daughters Helen and Betty that I mention would now be in their 90's.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 26, 2009, 10:26:29 PM
With White Place Farm being introduced, to the new health scheme of producing milk from Tuberculin Attested cattle in 1937. It was necessary to be able to transport cows in their own transport. So a suitable cattle lorry was purchased. It was housed in its own garage, which, is shown as # 6., on the farm map.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 30, 2009, 09:40:36 PM
Rural skilled craftsmen, are very much a dying breed. What was ever required on the farm or in the building trade was made in their shop on the farm or in the builders yard. So now we turn to take a look at them and their work at White Place Farm.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 03, 2009, 11:10:53 PM
Here is the story of a farm vehicle that was very busy in its heyday, but then methods of operation change and it becomes redundant and so does its driver.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 06, 2009, 10:56:50 PM
Buildings # 9. on the farm map were designed in the first place to hold freshly weaned heifer calves. Later they were converted to farrowing pens.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 11, 2009, 11:17:11 PM
The farm boiler and dairy had so much going on I could spend a very long time in describing all that went on. The dairyman and his wife put in very long days, but they also had help from the cowmen as well, always relief when it was required.

I will cover it all in greater depth in the stories and tales of Cookham in a book I am planning to produce at the end of this blog, but that is a year or so down the road.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 15, 2009, 12:25:14 AM
With the coming of TT milk, every effort was made to ensure not only the production was as clean as possible, but the health of the cattle was at the top of the list, so every care was taken, even to them walking through a footbath after every milking.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 17, 2009, 11:50:04 PM
I introduce the inventor of the milking machine into the story of White Place Farm to show how forward thinking the Astor’s were in developing this very modern model farming unit. From these early days of Dr. DeLaval to today’s computerized milking units, his pulsating claw unit principal is still in use.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 21, 2009, 10:01:11 PM
Moving on from my introduction of Dr. Gustav DeLaval to the milk production scene, we find that the second Lord Astor was in the forefront of modern farming of the day and making White Place Farm a show place of modern techniques and farming methods.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 24, 2009, 11:20:01 PM
This farm tool was created I believe from the old saying “Necessity is the mother of invention.”


 http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 28, 2009, 10:30:19 PM
The installation of a new farm water supply to all the pastures was just one of the things that had to be done before becoming a TT farm.  I will complete the story of the milking parlour when I return in the New Year.

Once again, a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 13, 2009, 11:03:12 PM
More History to come in the middle of January. Merry Christmas from Rarotonga.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 10, 2010, 09:09:29 PM
We will be back up and running in just over a weeks time. In the meantime may I suggest that you get a copy of "How to read a Village" by Richard Muir. My wife Deborah presented me with a copy for Christmas. It is very interesting reading.

Happy New Year to all my followers, over 32,000 of you now.

Regards,

James Hatch


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 15, 2010, 09:56:09 PM
Six weeks in Paradise nearly over. We hope to arrive back in Canada and Victoria late on Sunday evening 17th of January. I have started my written story of Cookham while here on Rarotonga.

So see you soon with more Cookham history soon.

Regards,

James Hatch


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 20, 2010, 06:07:12 PM
Well now I am back and will be continuing my look at Historical Cookham. While I have been away I have started a book on my recollections of Cookham and its residents during the 1930's 40's and 50's. I have reached as far as 1935 so far in three chapters, for some of you don't be surprised if your parents or grand parents get a mention in dispatches!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on January 20, 2010, 08:29:23 PM
Perhaps you should read Cookham Voices !


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 22, 2010, 12:42:24 AM
As promissed, I now continue with the saga of White Place Farm and the Three Timer Milking Parlour. It again was a system that was ahead of of its time in the 1930's. Now I am to understand that this will become a house. I hope the ghostly lowing of cattle and the cackling of capons do not keep the new residents awake!

More to come next week.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 24, 2010, 09:27:45 PM
How to Read a Village:

This wonderful book, written by Dr. Richard Muir, has to be a very handy reference book for anyone studying any village in Britain.  I received my copy as a Christmas present from my wife Deborah.  Already, several passages having enlightened me, how a village like Cookham grew from the earliest times.

One of the sources it can be obtained from, are the publishers of  “This England.” Located in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 27, 2010, 10:50:49 PM
Here is a little history of four fields and a river crossing that has all but vanished in 70 years. They were built as summer pasture for some of the Astor Cliveden Studd Farm for about 15 years.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 30, 2010, 11:17:05 PM
The rail fence in this post I meant to add to the previous post. So I have added it in right now before moving on to another topic.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 03, 2010, 08:43:54 PM
We now move back to the days when the arable side of cultivation was all horse power. Then their gradual demise with the coming of the farm tractor.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 05, 2010, 08:48:03 PM
Here is another spot of interest that use to exist at White Place Farm in its Hey-Day. The chances that one can find them still is very slight.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 10, 2010, 07:51:37 PM
The Holland family were around White Place Farm as I can remember back in the 1930's.
With Bill the father being Arable Foreman and his son Ernie who I will mention later in the Blog.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 13, 2010, 08:21:59 PM
The Holland family during their time at White Place Farm, became very well known around the village. Bill for his flower show blooms, and Ernie for his mechanical skills.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 16, 2010, 09:31:06 PM
I have just come away from talking about the horses at White Place Farm, when my research found this tool I remember being used on the farm while horses were being used to a large extent. Of course the tractor and the seed drill cut down the amount of horse work required. Anyhow I am posting this for the record of the past.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 21, 2010, 06:10:21 PM
Cookham has many listed buildings that need protection from the modern day developers, this building being one of them. It is very unique in its design and construction.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 24, 2010, 08:37:49 PM
Here are two more building that are still standing at White Place Farm. Though a lot of changes to what was the gardens have all gone.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 28, 2010, 06:41:38 PM
You may have heard of Bothy Ballards, well here is a Bothy tale. What young boys got up to!!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 04, 2010, 08:06:39 PM
These were grand farm structures in their day. The North American Cedar Silos, which believe it or not are still in use on a lot of farms in Canada and the States today.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 08, 2010, 12:48:37 AM
Once agai we examine a building that is to my understanding for its shape and size the only one of its design and size in Britain.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 10, 2010, 09:39:37 PM
We now wrap up the White Place Farm sewer system, which was way ahead of its time when it was built.

I will be away for a few days to join the Octogenarians, But will be back early next week.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 19, 2010, 07:17:08 PM
With the arrival of Google View, it has given me a chance to note the alterations to various shops and establishments. I have already received quite a few old photographs from good friends in the village, but I am looking for photos, which show the structural changes of the fronts of shops.

With the aid of modern computer techniques I am now able to reconstruct the building to look the way it was and thereby preserve for future historians an accurate picture of the village during the 1920’s, 30’s and 40’s. So please check your family albums for photos that were taken during that time period.

I have nearly finished the story of White Place Farm, but at the moment I am collecting information and doing a little research. Plus I will go up to finish off the Cliveden Stud Farm that Waldorf Astor started from scratch.

If you come across any old photos but do not have the means of sending them by computer, please contact either Pam Knight or Liz Kwantes who will send copies on to me.

Regards,

James Hatch


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 23, 2010, 07:38:22 PM
Thanks to Google View, I am now able to view quite a great many historical buildings in Cookham that are part and parcel of village history.

So I have started off with "The Lodges." at White Place Farm as a starter. Still a grand Tudor style building that the Astor's were very proud of.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 27, 2010, 07:59:22 PM
Here is feature in the village and on Sutton Road for those of you who like to take time and study the workmanship of village craftsmen around 100 years ago. The wall is the only thing left now as part of this historical area.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 30, 2010, 12:10:17 AM
This piece on White Place Farm is to make the reader aware of how far the farm reached. All the way to Lightlands and the Maidenhead Road from the Sutton Road.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 31, 2010, 09:06:37 PM
Now here a piece of history that will surprise quite a few, especially those living Sutton Close. More so to those living in #15. with the Monkey Puzzle tree.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 05, 2010, 01:59:11 AM
The Cookham Flower Show was during that era of village life, one of the most well attended events and a lot of friendly rivalry took place.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 08, 2010, 11:27:10 PM
Now lost to housing and a school expansion, this is a story of an orchard that existed for close to a 100 years of better in the village with some of the finest fruit.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 11, 2010, 01:04:16 AM
Oh yes there were more than one family of Spencer living in the village at the same time this man reminds me in his dress as that portrayed by David Suchet as Hercule Poirot of Television fame. Also his daughter was quite a notable artist in her own right, but shied away from being associated with the other artists.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 14, 2010, 11:31:13 PM
Well here as I mentioned is the answer to my first Cookham History Quiz question. There will be another Quiz qestion coming soon.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 18, 2010, 01:25:26 AM
As promissed I have brought the Kings Arms Sign stoty ahead for all of you to read about and what it means to the village history.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 21, 2010, 07:56:14 PM
As you know I have another History Quiz running. So I have decided to include a little of the history that I am aware of to help you dig up the answer to the question. There are quite a few of my blog followers who use to live in the village and have found memories of growing up here. If you are new to the village, ask around and you may find the answer.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 25, 2010, 07:16:06 PM
I have now added two more buildings, as to my wartime village activity clues for the current quiz question. “So have a go Joe.” As Wilfred Pickles use to say!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 28, 2010, 11:57:08 PM
The village butchers shop as it was has quite a history; even my father learned his slaughtering skills in the old slaughterhouse behind the shop. Those were the days when a poleaxe was the prime instrument in use.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 02, 2010, 11:34:37 PM
Well the answer to the Quiz question as to what did the three places has in common was weekly Whist Drives. Yes my mother and I use to walk all the way from Widbrook to the top of Kennel Lane for one of the drives. On our way home we could see the glow of the London Blitz, the Searchlights and bursting anti-aircraft shells exploding in the night sky.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 06, 2010, 12:14:14 AM
While writing up the previous blog on Whist Drives in Cookham during the war and the spectacle that one could see of the London Blitz from the top of Kennel Lane. I remember the several times that an Anti Aircraft Battery took up a position several times in Maidenhead field on the edge of Widbrook Common. Though from there, never was a shot fired. Though one could hear them plain enough from Dropmore Park.




http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 09, 2010, 11:51:21 PM
The next time you are walking the dog on the moor. Take a look and see if you can find traces of the old wartime pillbox that was used by the Home Guard.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 12, 2010, 11:10:47 PM
Another thing that happened in Cookham, or should I say passed through Cookham during the War. In my estimate that this telephone line stretched for somewhere in the range of 150 miles at least.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 19, 2010, 08:26:46 PM
In casting my mind back I got to thinking of that old Flanders and Swan song “The Gasman Cometh.” And when the primary source of light in Cookham homes was gaslight. Yes there was a time only the most affluent of village residents could afford electricity. There was one thing about gaslight was that it was very soft on the eyes. Anyway this is the story of the village by gaslight and where it was produced.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 23, 2010, 09:49:58 PM
The young today growing up in a village like Cookham have no idea that a household utility such as electricity was not in every home. For some coal gas was the norm, for others it was Paraffin oil or as known in North America as Kerosene and candlelight. This was not in the middle ages, but just seventy years ago. Just think no TV and no Tele-Tubbies! A few of us were lucky enough to be able to listen to a battery-powered radio and Uncle Mac on the BBC.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 26, 2010, 09:37:00 PM
Though I doubt if any one knows where a vehicle to day is running on coal gas, maybe the odd museum has one on display. Never the less they did exist, even coal gas is a thing of the past.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 29, 2010, 10:58:04 PM
This next piece of History I actually saw taking place though its whereabouts I am told is lost. It is a landscape “Pot Boiler” of Sir Stanley Spencer, who I knew as Uncle Stanley.
Maybe some Art expert reading this may know of its location.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 02, 2010, 07:51:57 PM
Cookham in the past has been known for manufacturing such items as Paper and Boots and Shoes. This story is about the last factory of its type in the village. Of course one could say that the producing of Animated Films in Moor Hall was a factory of sorts. Anyway what the ladies of the village did during the war went a long way to help the war effort. For some of you that was your Granny or Great Grandmother.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 06, 2010, 11:11:52 PM
I remember hearing quite a lot about Lord Desborough when I was growing up in the village. Of course he left quite a thumbprint on the work of the Thames Conservancy, even after his 32 years as its chairman.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 10, 2010, 11:29:22 PM
It seems that I hear a lot about our youth and their activities. This got me thinking back to my youth in Cookham and the way we spent our leisure time and had fun in doing it. So I picked one of my Friday evening haunts as an example, though it no longer exists in the same location, I am sure that the same evening enjoyment is still to be had just across the river.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 15, 2010, 11:53:53 PM
“Fred’s Club.” There lies a piece of local history that was the last survivor of the 1920’s and 30’s.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 20, 2010, 10:11:09 PM
Black Butts Cottages are about 75 years old, and was the first privately built housing estate in Cookham by a local architect,  Mr.  Vernon Kislingbury. The same architect that designed the Pinder Hall.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 24, 2010, 11:32:16 PM
There has been quite a lot written about The Pinder Hall already, which I will not go over old ground. This is by way of an introduction to my next blog that I was a part of, way back in 1936.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 29, 2010, 10:57:33 PM
The story of the first Holy Trinity School concert performed in the new Pinder Hall in 1936 I have split into two parts, as I am having to resort to making up scenes as you can see by this first one of the Infants Class as it was known in those days. It is remarkable to think that those taking part in this production are now Octogenarians.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 04, 2010, 01:21:21 AM
I think finding the right material subjects to make up the photo for this blog took the greatest time to find and then construct. Still it is an example of what a village school in 1936 could achieve. Just think there may be some of the cast still living in the village.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 08, 2010, 11:48:12 PM
Now at least one more historical concert given at the Pinder Hall. This was wartime and everyone got behind the various savings campaigns. This one was for “Wings for Victory.”


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 14, 2010, 12:15:53 AM
Now we take a look at the school in High Road as it was during its hey day and the 1940’s. The teaching staff having to put up with short supplies and even staff.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: anon on July 14, 2010, 08:03:35 AM
"Even Staff" are much better than "Odd Staff". Or were you postulating that they could only hire in pairs, or nobody over 4'6"?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 18, 2010, 03:57:34 PM
Of all my teachers that were responsible for education in Cookham. Mrs. Evans from Furze Platt is the only photo that I have with grateful thanks to her grandaughter.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 21, 2010, 11:31:52 PM
Another step back into the infants class at Holy Trinity School in and around early 1920 or before with a much younger Mrs. Evans. To think, those from that class who are still alive today will be in their nineties.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 27, 2010, 11:44:10 PM
Here are two close up photographs of children in the Infants class in the 1920’s, actual date is unknown. A tremendous difference can be seen in the children that I met in the same room, when I visited the school in 2000, at the invitation of the then head teacher.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: marmite on July 28, 2010, 11:58:34 AM
Does anyone know the history of the cherry orchard in Cookham Dean?  I'm trying to find out when it was planted.  It's between Dean Lane and Startins Lane, part of Winter Hill Farm I think.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 28, 2010, 03:52:17 PM
Hullo Marmite nice of you to enquire. Here is an outline of what use to be:

The cherry orchards of Cookham Dean were at one time was as famous as the Hop Fields of Kent, and there was a good demand for them in Covent Garden Market. During the picking season migrant pickers would come out from London to pick the fruit. This practice carried on up until the late 1940’s early 50’s, when getting labour became more difficult and costs rose to a point where the profit margin had vanished to almost nil. Also the age of the trees was another factor. I can’t give you any exact dates but the Copas family that owned those orchards would be a good place to start.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 28, 2010, 08:40:22 PM
Going back over my photo and video files I found this little clip that I took back in March 2000. The subject covers the school toilet system that existed up until early 1940, when it was upgraded so as to accomodate the influx of evacuees from London.

Oh yes I forgot! Turn up your sound.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 31, 2010, 01:05:47 PM
Here is a Birthday Card with a difference. Yes, on the 1st of August Historical Cookham will be two years old. You will have seen my first video addition on what was once an old school loo. I still have a few more up my sleeve yet to come.

Oh yes, turn up your sound!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 03, 2010, 11:23:57 PM
I new that I had taken quite a few videos with my early JVC digital video tape camera and knew that I had transferred them to a computer and could not remember what I had filed them under. Then a short while ago they all turned up when I was looking for something else. At least I expect that I am the only person to video Cookham Bridge while it was under repair at that time.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 07, 2010, 10:30:15 PM
This next video is a carry on to the actual Infants classroom of the 1930’s and its stalwart teacher Mrs. Evans, together with her assistant, a Miss Collins. In the 65 years from when I attended school in that classroom in 1935, quite a lot has changed from a strict learn by rote system to a more casual approach to learning. Though I must add the old ways have served me very well indeed.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 10, 2010, 11:24:23 PM
I knew that I had taken quite a lot of video when I visited Cookham in March, 2000. For the longest time I thought it was lost on an old Windows 98 computer. Then a short time ago I found it and now I am able to bring you some old 10-year history of the village’s daily life.

The story of the traffic density over Cookham Bridge has been kicked around by the moaners and groaners for quite some time. So as I had a clip of the repair going on at that time. I thought why not post it to show the extent of the work that was carried out.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 14, 2010, 08:00:58 PM
The John Lewis Partnership has been resident to the village and has been enjoyed by both the partners and villagers down through the years. The highlight of the year for all was the Rag Regatta. I want to thank Judy Faraday of the Partnership Archives for her help.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 17, 2010, 06:23:19 PM
I will not be posting to the Blog for about the next 10 days, as I will be in Nova Scotia for a visit to family and old friends. That is to say that I will be keeping an eye on Cookham.com!



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 24, 2010, 07:06:59 PM
Heading home tomorrow with a lot more pictures of Cookham and its past. should be up and rolling by the weekend.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 27, 2010, 11:19:15 PM
The Pinder Hall in its 74 years of use by the village has seen quite a lot of events. From wedding receptions to even being a school during the war.

Dances were always well attended by the village youth, and even those from Maidenhead and Bray as well.

As you know I have been trying to find out what happened to the two people in the photograph, Ann Garwood and Roy East. It would be nice to be in touch once again, but after 64 years I guess that is hard to hope for.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 01, 2010, 06:58:28 PM
 The August Bank Holiday Bell Ringers Outing was always a highlight of the tower members and many non-ringing parish members as well. We were always joined by ringing members of All Saints Church, Boyne Hill, Maidenhead as well. In the later years the coach was hired from Windsorian Coaches, who could take close to fifty people. I am sure that there are one or two ringers or whose parents were ringers that remember these outings.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 05, 2010, 09:51:34 PM
Digging up the village past and seeing old photographs and friends gives me a great deal of enjoyment in the process. Thomas John Fowler, I have mention more than once in this blog. Walter “Simmy” Ing the vicar’s gardener was a little harder to obtain a photograph of. I did know that this one existed and I took a video picture of it back in March 2000. Not very clear I am afraid, but at least it is a photo, and I doubt that any of Walter’s family are still in the village today.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 12, 2010, 07:42:01 PM
There are very few around now that would remember Sgt. Ron Fowler (RAF). Who like his father was a very well known bell ringer. The photo like the one of his father was taken with with a video camera back in March 2000. So it is a little out of focus. It is nice to see that these pieces of church history are still preserved in the ringing chamber.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 17, 2010, 08:56:11 PM
Awhile ago, I noticed that a Charity Beating of the Bounds was being organized. On looking at their map I noticed that one of the markers had been missed out on White Place Farm. Why it was missed I have no idea.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 23, 2010, 11:53:43 PM
A lot has been posted about speed in Cookham Dean of late, here is an item of interest that takes you back about 160 years.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 29, 2010, 10:53:22 PM
Funeral Hatchments are another part of Cookham’s glorious historic past, and although not seen on a regular basis by the general public, they still hang within the walls of the church and in the Ringing Chamber in particular.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on September 30, 2010, 12:59:21 AM
Now that is a good piece of village history!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 03, 2010, 11:46:37 PM
Again with the thought of Harvest Festival in mind, got me thinking of the old Rood Screen that use to be in Holy Trinity Church, together with its beautiful hand carved features. Also the way it supported the sheaves of corn for those Sunday services.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 07, 2010, 09:49:38 PM
Now we travel back to the summer of 1937. They talk about global warming today, but that was one hot summer. Where farmers were mowing the hay one day and on the second day it was being put into a hayrick. Even the harvest was all finish by the end of August. That month was the time that the Plymouth Boys Brigade came for a months camp as the guests of Lord and Lady Astor.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 13, 2010, 11:54:59 PM
Still with the Boys Brigade of 1937. This time with a picture of their Drum and Bugle Corps.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 20, 2010, 10:53:47 PM
A lot of comments and interest in the artificial ice rink at Windsor. It got me thinking back when Cookham Villagers and others use to enjoy rinks that Mother Nature use to provide at both Widbrook and Cockmarsh. All it cost was the time to get to either place. Widbrook was very popular as it was the easier of the two to get to, though a little smaller in size.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 25, 2010, 11:04:51 PM
Christmas Puddings took me back to one important item in the Hatch household. That being the family laundry copper, which in October was used to cook all the puddings my mother use to make. I managed to find an antique model that was very much like the one mother had.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 30, 2010, 07:26:43 PM
Once again a scene of the past and seventy odd years ago, That of Nicholsons’ Brewery in Maidenhead High Street. Their product could be found in the stores in the village, on the farms during haymaking and harvest, and of course not forgetting the beer tent at Agricultural and local Flower Shows.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 05, 2010, 08:23:16 PM
The Snob’s Last has been around in the village way before my time, and was a tool that every village cottage home had. Besides used its designed use for the repair of boots and shoes. It found many other uses, latterly that of being a doorstop.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 07, 2010, 09:13:02 PM
Hearing about the Guy Fawkes celebration that was held by the scouts in Mill Lane, triggered my memory to those Guy Fawkes Nights we had on the common at Widbrook in the 1930’s.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 10, 2010, 11:29:36 PM
I don’t suppose there are many people left living in Cookham or Maidenhead that will remember Nate Smith’s Toy Shop on the Colonnade in Maidenhead next to the Bear Hotel. It was a little boy’s wonderland to say the least.




http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 17, 2010, 03:55:21 AM
Another store in Maidenhead that has long since gone, that of James Moore’s Men and Boys Wear. This store is located just the other side of the Bear Hotel in Maidenhead and well used by the people living in Cookham.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 25, 2010, 02:21:22 AM
Now we return to the village itself and the greengrocers and taxi service that in business in the 1930’s and 40’s. Mr. & Mrs. Wilmink were well known by the whole village.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 29, 2010, 11:49:12 PM
Historically many Christmases have come and gone in Cookham of which I have many happy memories. My video is a way of sharing another Merry Christmas with you.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Montyzo on December 12, 2010, 11:27:10 PM
Monty

Good name.

Did the floods cover the whole of school lane? If the school was still open it sounds as if it escaped? How far up from the memorial does it flood?

Do you know where I might find specific details of the flood

Thank you

Montyzo


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 12, 2010, 11:43:49 PM
Hullo Montyzo:
I give you your full title as we have a Monty already on the list. I am answering this question of yours from the Cook Islands in the South Pacific. Flood waters came up Mill Lane to just short of Sutton Road. Halfway up the high street to just about Barnside Motors. The moor end of school lane the grade is fairly steep and it came up to the second or third house. Also the water came up to where the Tarrystone is now sited. This I am refering to is the 1947 flood. No the floodwater did not reach the school.





Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 13, 2011, 07:16:58 PM
Will be back and posting next week after a wonderful holiday in the sun.

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 02, 2011, 07:58:50 PM
The name of Pinder Brown will be well remembered by the older and long established residents of the village. Of course there is a living memorial in the Pinder Hall built and opened in the summer of 1936.

Gwen Pinder Pinder Brown stepped into the breach as her fathers able assistant on the death of her mother.

She was a great lady and not to be forgotten.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 06, 2011, 06:40:46 PM
I have just had a long newsy letter from Dennis Newland in Perth, Australia. With some reflections, on his wartime life in Ellington Park, Maidenhead. Also his visit to the Maidenhead Isolation Hospital, when his sister came down with Scarlet Fever, also known as Scarletina.

With it I have managed to dig up an old WWII Ration Book.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 10, 2011, 07:19:44 PM
I wonder how many people living in the village had one of these cards and actually still posses one of these cards today? Of course if they produced such a card today, it would carry a photo and of course the latest chip and most likely a finger and eye print as well. Such is the progress in identification in the past 70 odd years.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 19, 2011, 11:36:43 PM
Ted and Anna Barrett were well known people who lived at White Place Farm. With many thanks to Carole Wiffen of Frinton on Sea for suppling me with the photograph.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 25, 2011, 08:51:36 PM
The Corgi Scooter was a purpose built machine to get the landing paratroops to their target point as soon as possible after landing. They were very popular after the war when they came onto the market as war surplus. They filled a gap for people until alternative transport was made available. As you had to go on a waiting list to buy a small car.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 05, 2011, 06:19:58 PM
This little machine did not become very popular with the general cycling public after the war. Never the less it was one of those inventions that came on the market to bring industry back to peacetime production. Its life was short lived and was gone within two years.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 09, 2011, 01:08:51 AM
During the war as boys we had to make our own amusement and toys in particular. A gift of an old set of pram wheels were like having a 365 day feast of sweets and goodies. This how my set of wheels that I was given ended up.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 16, 2011, 05:37:03 PM
I doubt if you could find a carbide lamp in use in Cookham today! I am sure that museum is the only place where you can find one. Anyway enjoy my story.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 19, 2011, 08:36:04 PM
Once again I go back to my days in Holy Trinity School. This time covering pen nibs, powder ink and inkwells in the desk. Also a much forgotten skill, that of “Penmanship.”


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 23, 2011, 11:37:14 PM
This blog concludes my story on the Carbide granule and Acetylene Lamp used on cars and bicycles. Plus a schoolboys prank.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 31, 2011, 12:37:02 AM
As Cookham was once a Royal Manor and deeds and titles on some of the older properties go back a great many years. The terms, conditions and measurement may befuddled quite a few people, especially if you are new to this country, or so young that these measurements are no longer taught in school.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 02, 2011, 08:38:09 PM
With the local conversation being directed around the building of a new community centre. My thoughts went back to how the church raised its money in bygone years. With a tithe of 10% of your total earnings. Of course it was not all hard cash, but in kind. Not so long ago I can remember when produce that decorated the church for Harvest Thanksgiving went to the Maidenhead Cottage Hospital, now of course long since gone.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: VBrown on April 06, 2011, 12:33:47 PM
I lived in Cookham Rise from 1947 to about 1954, some of my family still live there. We came from London via a number of places. Do you remember Jack Smith the butcher, I was a friend of his son Bev. I remember Reg Moon and his cofee shop, we used to drink at The Kings Arms (under the arch) when it was run by Bill Baker. I am not in touch with anybody from that time and would like to hear from anyboy that remembers me. Vic Brown.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Archimedes on April 06, 2011, 02:59:10 PM
James Hatch has included Jack Smith in his history blog, you can see it here:

http://widbrook2.blogspot.com/2010/04/jack-smith-son-butcher.html (http://widbrook2.blogspot.com/2010/04/jack-smith-son-butcher.html)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 08, 2011, 08:56:40 PM
The Turk family was well known on the Thames as boat builders and watermen. More so in fact as the Royal Swan Master, responsible for the counting of the swans at the end of the nesting season.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 13, 2011, 11:45:21 PM
I have been presented with a photo of a very young man who was born in Cookham. Now we will see how many people will remember him from the photo on the Blog.
This is when the village supported thirteen pubs and an off license. The village had its own football team. So who is he?


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on April 14, 2011, 02:24:25 PM
Looks like Freddy Hains to me !!!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on April 14, 2011, 02:29:59 PM
I thought the village still had its own football team.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 14, 2011, 02:54:32 PM
Well Brillo, you win the cupee doll. Yes it is Fred "Gassey" Haines. I have a few more of that era that I will test you with in the future.

Yes Cookham Village did have its own Football club Roger, with their home ground at the Odney Club. It sponsor and organizer was Bill Baker, landlord of the Kings Arms.

Also I wonder how many will remember the "Cookham Cossacks?" and what was their sport?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on April 15, 2011, 03:19:59 PM
I hate to be a know it all, "Cookham Cossacks" was a cycle speedway team, the track was on Bob Caughts farm now part of Winterhill Golf Course.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 15, 2011, 03:43:01 PM
Right again Brillo! It is nice to meet up with someone with a good memory. There were two spinster ladies, both in the same profession. One was called Dolly and the other Snotty. Who were they, and what was there profession?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on April 16, 2011, 01:26:51 AM
Ah, Dolly Drew and Snotty Graham.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 16, 2011, 03:44:11 AM
Jolly good Roger. Dolly always wore sandles, and had a bouncy step. While Snotty always wore heavy tweeds, winter and summer. Tell me Roger, What did Mrs. Isherwood and Mrs. Deacon do?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 23, 2011, 03:32:17 AM
Another photo from Cookham's past. Now I am looking for his school nick-name given to him as the school goal keeper. I am not looking for another nick-name he was given by his workmates.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 27, 2011, 03:25:45 PM
It seems that no one recognizes this young man. By the way his mother was also very well known in the village.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Barney Rubble on May 03, 2011, 07:24:01 PM
Hey! I think I know who that is! That's Charlie 'Slogger' Smith, who lived in the High Street. His mum I believe was called Minnie.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 05, 2011, 08:19:58 PM
Right on Barney! You have a good memory indeed.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 07, 2011, 07:40:47 PM
I wonder how many of you follow "Heartbeat." The life depicted in that north country area was very similar to that in Cookham. Oh Yes! we did have our village characters as well. They of course will be name-less.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 12, 2011, 05:44:25 PM
Not many people left in the village these days that will remember Dean Luxury Coaches. Who would take some of the villagers to the seaside for a day, or a show in London's West End.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 15, 2011, 07:20:04 PM
Thinking of my Uncle Bill's Nursery, triggered another bit of village history:

There was a time in Cookham when you could go to your local grocer, either Budgen’s, or the International Stores in the high street and buy your bacon sliced to the thickness that you required. Ah yes! The fragrant smell that arose from the bacon as it was being sliced, something that nowadays one does not get with prepackaged bacon.

Are well you youngsters, just think what you have missed!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 17, 2011, 12:26:12 AM
There was a time in Cookham, as well as anywhere else in the British Isles when something happened to a neighbours family. There was always this stock phrase being used. "Don't worry dear, come cand have a nice cuppa tea." This is when I came around to thinking of now, it all the American invention of the tea bag. I of course cast my mind back to the family tea caddy and the making of tea.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on May 17, 2011, 12:35:54 AM
My mother uses an old tea caddy (virtually identical to the photo) as a sewing box. I imagine there are still a lot around. You will also be surprised the number of people in Cookham who buy loose tea. Even the Co-op stocks it. If you work on a building site you would be strung up if you did not warm the pot first. Nothng has really changed about the great British cuppa.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 17, 2011, 02:42:51 PM
Thanks Roger for your update.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 20, 2011, 01:15:22 AM
No I am not going to talk about trains! Though my train of thought has turned to the day when little boys could buy bags of broken biscuits for tuppence! The hey day of good wholesome food from your village shop, like The International or Budgens.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 24, 2011, 12:38:22 AM
Once again I refer back to when shopping for food in the village was very much of a social pleasure for the village ladies. Not only could they buy all the groceries that they wanted, but all their wine, beer and spirit needs as well. Plus there was a delivery service as well provided. This time I refer to another shop skill, that of cutting cheese on a beech board with a fine wire cutter.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 26, 2011, 06:27:52 PM
There are not many people living in Cookham now that know that Cookham had its own Supermarket: “THE INTERNATIONAL STORES.” Which occupied the whole space taken up now by The Cookham Arcade.
The first retail branch of ‘Kearley & Tonge’ was opened in Brentford, Middlesex in 1878. The business taking its name from two of its founders H E Kearley and G A Tonge.



http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 28, 2011, 06:00:31 PM
The subject of having a Fish & Chip outlet in Cookham has been raised recently. Now it could be in the form of a fixed location or a mobile one, serving different housing estates on different days of the week.

My history goes back to when you could buy Fish & Chips wrapped in newspaper.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 31, 2011, 06:03:54 PM
What a difference 70 years can make on the village moor. You have just had another Jazz Festival, whereas 70 years earlier it was the scene of a mock tank battle during the first of the National Saving campaigns called, “War Weapons Week.”

For that week a tank was on show to the public just by the War Memorial. I remember climbing with other village boys inside the tank and looking through the gunner’s periscope. Then on Saturday afternoon with a great many watching the mock “Battle of Cookham Moor.”


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 01, 2011, 09:16:55 PM
There are not many of this variety of tree around, and those that are were planted for ornamental purposes. I refer to the Monkey Puzzle Tree. There use to be two in the village. The one I refer to, is of special significance to yours truly, as you will see when you read the story.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 04, 2011, 08:29:25 PM
Once again thanks to the Google roving car camera I have been able to catch a upto date photo of the Vilage first purpose built Fire Station at the bottom of Terrys Lane. It was built as the date inscribed over the door in 1910.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 07, 2011, 02:49:02 AM
Once again I swing my attention to Cookham Dean and about 70 years ago and the Women's Institute Hall which at that time was located on Kennel Lane. Kennel Lane at that time was just a rough gravel track. I recall it was the hight of the London Blitz and as one walked down the lane to High Road, one could see the glow of London burning and the anti-aircraft shells bursting like fireworks over Cliveden woods.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 10, 2011, 01:26:10 AM
The next time you are in the village and stand by the War Memorial facing in a South Westerly direction and take a good look at this building. The original structure in my estimate is somewhere between 250 and 300 years old. Oh alterations have been made by its various owners over the years, but the basic shell of the building is that old. You can now see why this once Royal Manor should be preserved.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 10, 2011, 01:31:24 PM
By the way the sketch of "The House that Leans." Is dated 1833. No Bagheera I did not draw this sketch! But I did draw the pen & ink sketch of Holy Trinity School.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 13, 2011, 07:36:24 PM
There maybe a few still living in Cookham Dean who will remember Dennis Adams who took over Carmonta Bakery from Ken Deadman and turned it into Carmonta Stores. With many grateful thanks to Dennis I am now able to bring some of his amateur photographic work that he did while living in Cookham Dean.

Now I have enlarged two of Dennis's photos to see if anyone recognises the little boy outside The Jolly Farmer. Also the tractor driver that loved doughnuts.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 14, 2011, 08:53:18 PM
The photograph of a bicycle outside the Jolly Farmer, which was obtained from Dennis Adams. Takes me back some 60-70 years ago when people use to either walk to their local or ride a bicycle. One such village character was Teddy Wakelin.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on June 15, 2011, 05:14:23 PM
Now Iknow that you have a selective memory James, the one thing that Teddy Wakeling was incapable of doing when he had a pint or ten was to ride his bike in a straight line !!!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 16, 2011, 12:38:11 AM
Maybe Brillo you saw him trying to turn a corner. I only saw him riding across the Moor from Jimmy Mayes pub.

Now if your memory is good. who are the people in the photos? The little boy and the tractor driver who loved doughnuts.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 16, 2011, 02:05:10 PM
Once again I have just received some cracking good photos of a Sports and Prize Giving Day at Herries School 51 years ago from Dennis Adams. So don't be surprised if you were an old Herrionian, being caught on candid camera.

Photos not there yet, but they will be.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 17, 2011, 04:38:28 PM
Now here is a first prixe winning photo called "Pudseys in the Snow." Yes it did win Dennis Adams first place in a national amateur photographic competition. Pudseys, for those who are not familiar with Cookham Dean is located in Spring Lane. Both Dennis and I would love to have a photo of how the cottage looks now. Also has anyone any knowledge how the cottage got its name "Pudseys?"

A further note: The word Pudsey seems to go back to Anglo-Saxon times. A clearing in a wood on high ground. In Norman times a Pudsey was worth 40 shillings.

Also I have just updated the blog once again as I have received more information from the Darby History of Cookham. This makes this house very interesting indeed.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 18, 2011, 05:58:42 PM
Searching through my record files I came across this "Punch Magazine" cartoon of a Victorian Higgler with his donkey cart. It valso fitted with Stephen Darby's description of Thomas Pudsey.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 20, 2011, 01:44:32 AM
Once again we are back taking another look at The Jolly Farmer, at a time when it was a Courage house. Also I have been able to do this with the help of Dennis Adams, who ran the Grocery Store at the old Carmonta Bakery.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 22, 2011, 07:02:38 PM
Another photo by Dennis Adams, taken some 50 years ago of the Church Lychgate at Cookham Dean.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 23, 2011, 03:08:48 PM
Maidenhead Heritage is planning an exhibition of “Historical 999”. They have knowledge of the Cookham Volunteer Fire Brigade. They also have knowledge that the St. John Ambulance was organized in the village.

This was a fact that during the war it was located in a building just behind the Railway Tavern, as I with many others from school were members were St. John Ambulance Cadets.

If anyone has any other information or old photos that they could use, please contact Brian at The Maidenhead Heritage Centre.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 26, 2011, 01:34:31 AM
Once again we are back up in Cookham Dean and this time to Mayfield, or better known as Herries School. Of course the building has quite a history attached to it. As it was once the home of Kenneth Grahame the autor of that well known childrens book "The Wind in the Willows.

If you were a student there some fifty years ago your photo may turn up in a collection taken by Dennis Adams.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 28, 2011, 03:11:48 AM
If you were a student at Herries Preparatory School some fifty years ago you may be able to spot yourself with all your classmates.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 28, 2011, 06:27:55 PM
From the full sized photo of the Prize Giving at Herries I have managed to enlarge the group section. Here I have inserted two photos starting from the righthand side of that group.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on June 28, 2011, 08:18:44 PM
On yuour blog re Fire stration my Grandad Fred Robinson was Fire Chief at Cookham fire Station for many years, all through the war and my mother helped out.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on June 28, 2011, 08:21:34 PM
Also to add to my reply my grandparents lived in Terrys Lane for years and I was born there.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 29, 2011, 11:54:09 PM
Two more close-up photographs of a Herries Prize Giving some 50 years ago. Have you found either your mother or father yet?


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 01, 2011, 08:13:26 PM
Here is the third and last of the Herries Prize Giving Day students. According to Dennis Adams who took these photographs the lady walking behind the seated students is Mrs. Armstrong the schools founder.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 04, 2011, 12:47:29 AM
With my recent photos and stories of Herries School, formerly Kenneth Grahame's house Mayfield. I have been wanting to work in the story of the first motorcar owned by a resident of Cookham. Also the story of how Kenneth Grahame's Wind the Willows had a very close local connection.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 06, 2011, 06:26:45 PM
Once again we swing back to another couple of photos of the Herries Sports Day of 1960. This time we cover the for the want of a better word: The Stilt Can Race."

We have no idea who the young man was who won the race, or the young lady who came second. The third place winner we know was Nick Adams. The son of the photographer and shopkeeper at Carmonta Dennis B. Adams.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 08, 2011, 03:42:36 PM
Sports Day at Herries was 51 years ago not just for the students! The mothers had to show off their ability to be able to still run. Practise gained no doubt from chasing after their offspring.

If the same entrants were to race today it would a classic: "The Galloping Grannies."


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 10, 2011, 07:58:18 PM
It is hard to believe that the next three photos were taken 51 years ago at Herries Sports Day.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 13, 2011, 08:10:40 PM
This is the last of the Herries School group of 1960 taken with very grateful thanks to Mr. Dennis Adams who use to run the Carmonta Stores after Ken Deadman gave up baking bread. In this last group take a good look at the little boys face in the close up that I have managed to capture.

I will be back towards the end of the month with more history as I am off to visit my youngest son and his family in Nova Scotia.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on July 14, 2011, 02:59:55 PM
The upper class's at school !!!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 18, 2011, 08:28:28 PM
Upper, Middle or Lower class dear Brillo, it is all village history! Remember you can't change history, but you can learn from it!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 27, 2011, 12:38:26 AM
To wrap up my history of Herries Prep School, I came across this picture of a group of school girls in their school uniform. It is very interesting to see how in some schools the school dress code has been relaxed, and that is not for the better. Schools are for learning the basics of the students education, not a fashion parade!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Jo Jo on July 27, 2011, 10:46:45 AM
I think I disagree with you on current school uniform James. It may be true in Canada that young people are allowed to wear anything, but most schools are fairly rigorous regarding school uniform and offer second hand shops for the uniform as well.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 27, 2011, 01:55:33 PM
Well that I am glad to hear JoJo. I do know that even in the West Indies, The Cook Islands, New Zealand and Australia, school uniforms are manditory.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 29, 2011, 05:28:26 PM
Coming up soon. The Blogs third birthday.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 01, 2011, 09:36:57 PM
Well here it is the Historical Cookham Blog 3rd Birthday on the 1st of August. I also wish to thank all those who have made this happen.

Averaging very close to 62 hits a day has been most gratifying from those around the world who are my constant followers, for which I wish to say thank you.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 04, 2011, 03:21:48 AM
As you walk around the Village, Rise or Dean or even wonder about the house you live in. Now I am not refering to houses built after World War II, but those that were built in the early 1900's and even back to the early 1800's. Yes Keeley's Cottages in the High Street have a tale to tell, about the cottage industry of boot and shoe making. Which together with farming made up the village past history.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 07, 2011, 03:22:26 AM
I am at present researching further into the village cottage boot and shoe industry. So there is more to come, but it make take a little while, as I like to be certain of my facts, as ther is quite a few routes to follow.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 08, 2011, 09:18:38 PM
I had an e-mail today from one Danny Cole asking me to look at a photo of Cookham Army Cadets outside the Crown. Sadly the photo did not arrive. Anyway it got me thinking of things that I use to do during that period. One thing that came to mind was that I use to be my fathers Saturday Boy, to deliver meat to his customers.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 10, 2011, 09:38:03 PM
It was only just about 80 years ago when the next little item was still well used in many a Cookham home. Even if you were travelling and staying at a Local Inn or Hotel, you would expect to find the very same thing in use. If you find a old wash stand today, or should I say the marble top off one, you will find it very useful for making top quality pastry.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 12, 2011, 07:17:36 PM
Now we take a look at Cookham in 1942. The Cookham Army Cadets. It is with many thanks from Dan Coles, the Sgt. Cadet in the group, that we are able to put together a list of those who were members of the group. This will be ideal for those who are looking for their fathers, grandfathers or even great grandfathers who lived in the village at that time.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 16, 2011, 12:01:35 AM
I wonder how many can remember the wartime "Stone Pig."? Some may still be in use in the village to this day.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 17, 2011, 11:54:28 PM
In researching through things that were at one time were in regular use on a Monday in Cookham for a good many years. This was the laundry washboard, which was always in use every Monday morning. After the washing machine took over and it became redundant until Lonnie Donegan and Skiffle came along.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 19, 2011, 07:44:53 PM
I now go back to the first of three buildings that have stood on the same site for at least 300 years. The Crown as you know it today was originally known as the Crown Inn. From the architecture it is estimated to be in the early 1700's. It like so many houses still standing today were made of oak frame and infilled with wattle and daub.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 22, 2011, 08:08:17 PM
As I have mentioned in the previous blog that the story of the original Crown Inn could be likened to many of that era some 200 years ago, and the comfort the traveler could expect when he or she stopped over in Cookham for the night.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 25, 2011, 12:31:37 AM
We now look at the rather short life of the second Crown Inn, or rather the Crown Hotel as it was then called. This large grand building was constructed to serve the ever growing traveling  public and their new motor cars. In those heady days of the early 1900's. It was always good to be seen boating on the Thames, or in one of the thirty night clubs along the river.


http:widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 25, 2011, 08:27:55 PM
Although I have written about the Cookham Fire Station and its wartime history, but I never told anyone about the little industry that took place there during the war in the production of leather handbags and change purses.

I wonder if a daughter has one of these articles handed down from her mother?


http:widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 27, 2011, 06:21:19 PM
I have just come across some documentation that before the Fire Station came into existance the building was used as a village meeting place. After the Volunteer Fire Brigade took over it was still used for village meetings. It which case all the equipment was moved outside to make room for the event that was taking place.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 30, 2011, 09:34:30 PM
This next posting has historical ties to the village, and some of you will remember the sister of the late Desmond Atkinson. Who was a great contributor the Christmas Pantomime at the Pinder Hall. I therefore asked her niece Carol to write a small tribute to her Aunt Heather.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 03, 2011, 06:44:55 PM
There has been quite a lot of talk lately about Odney and cowpats. Well the Moor was also well grazed not only by cows, but by pigs and geese as well in years gone by. As old photos show Cookham High Street was used as dropping zone for not only cows but horses as well.

The causeway as you know it today was for a good many years was made up of a series of earth mounds and seven foot bridges. This story will continue in another blog.


http:/widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 06, 2011, 08:55:13 PM
Now we get down to the location of four village gates that were erected to ensure that any cattle put out on the moor did not stray. Associated with these four gates were four smaller gates known as “Kissing Gates.” These were to allow free access of passage by pedestrian traffic, not as some of my wisecracking villagers may think, of where a poor damsel could be cornered for a snogging session.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 07, 2011, 07:09:32 PM
I wish to thank two of my most ardent followers. One who sent me a photo of an Odney Cowpat or Cow Chip. The other who drew my attention to what Stephen Darby had to say about the same topic.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 09, 2011, 07:57:47 PM
To wind up the history of good pasture management I am introducing the Aitkenhead Chain Harrow. This impliment has been used on British Farms for at least 150 years or maybe longer. Horse drawn in the early days and used today, behind a tractor with a three point hitch.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 12, 2011, 12:12:40 AM
The first way to cross the river in the very early days was to ford the river at the shallowest spot. Then with the improvements to the river with a series of locks and weirs, made it so fording was not possible. So an early form of chain ferry was introduced.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 14, 2011, 08:13:34 PM
With help from the Maidenhead Waterways Preservation Society and the Bourne End Video Camera Club. I can know bring you the story of one of the villages well known and loved residents, Eddy Smythe. I knew Eddy for the best part of 60 years, always smiling and ready to give a person a helping hand.

I hope to bring to you part of an interview in the near future on the new Video Blog "Cookham in Motion." which you will find at: http://widbrook4.blogspot.com.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 17, 2011, 06:50:58 PM
The whole of Cookham is steeped in history. This time it is still conected with the river and what was the horse drawn barge trade. Also how the horses had to be moved from one side of the river to the other as the need arose.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 21, 2011, 11:10:49 PM
There has been quite a lot been discussed lately about this 82 year old bridge, which as some of you know was a gift to the village by Mrs Belfour-Allen in memory of her late husband. This structure was built by tradesmen who took pride in what did, knowing full well that it would last for a very long time. It was not built to take European juganauts.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 25, 2011, 12:15:20 AM
The Brooks family, very well known in Cookham for almost a century as the Ferry folk that ran the ferry from Cookham Bridge to Sashes Island, until it was closed in 1956.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 28, 2011, 07:50:14 PM
In 1947 this was what once was the Cookham village Chain Ferry Slip. This of course was replaced by the first wooden bridge and later by the now iron structure.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 02, 2011, 01:12:28 AM
Still working with the Cookham Chain Ferry of 160 years ago. This ferry was a manual crank handle drive wound by the ferryman and in this photo shows the chain coming up through the guide.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 05, 2011, 07:08:53 PM
Just as it happens and with many thanks to Neville Lee in Australia I am able to have an artists painting which I have cropped to show Holy Trinity Church and the ferry slip as it was in 1798, or there abouts.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 09, 2011, 10:11:21 PM
Still with the chain ferry that ran from the bottom of Ferry Lane across the river to the Bourne End side. I found it very hard to find an exact example of a hand cranked ferry of the late 1700's. So with thanks to the ferry at Trowlock Island and the Steam Ferry at Southwold I have been able to give the reader an idea of how it worked.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 15, 2011, 01:19:26 AM
We now move on to the first Cookham Toll bridge of wooden construction, and because it lacked any proper preservative, rot began to set in very quickly. Anyway I am sure you will enjoy the information. Even in those days of the late 1830's it seems that costs were never on budget!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 21, 2011, 12:56:22 AM
The iron replacement bridge which is still in existance today has given the local residents yeoman service, and I am sure will continue to do so, if given regular tender loving care and not abused.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 24, 2011, 09:48:14 PM
These use to be years ago quite a great deal of barge traffic on the river. The upstream deflection piers were installed as preventative meassure to stop the barges coliding with the bridge supports.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 25, 2011, 08:16:20 PM
Yes Monty I remember Harold 'Tacker" Aplin very well and his motor cycle and sidecar. He was also a church bell ringer as well. Ah yes! Miss Willis, very prim and proper and kept things in good order.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 29, 2011, 09:01:06 PM
Very few people living in Cookham today will know that one time we had our own slaughterhouse to provide the village with locally grown meat. Even Bourne End had one up until the begining of the war in 1939.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 04, 2011, 09:12:59 PM
St Georges Lodge in thge Village has quite a colourful history, especially during the second world war.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 08, 2011, 10:56:26 PM
For those whose home is in Maidenhead Court know the recent history of the place. Battlemead has quite an old history, but during the Second World War it was the home to quite a few troops.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 24, 2011, 12:45:31 AM
I have spoken a lot about the old chain ferry. In this photo taken in 1875 the house to the left of the picture is the old Georgian mansion, which was the first "The Grove." In March 1919 it was destroyed by fire during one of Cookham's floods. History has a habit of repeating itself and I hope the council will take note.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 29, 2011, 09:46:18 PM
There was a time when bridges crossing the Thames were very few and far between. Fording the river at a shallow point was the way across, or in later years the chain ferry. Places were named after their crossing points. Case in point comes to mind "Oxenford." A place where Ox trains could ford the river. Now of course it is known as Oxford.

In those days it was the hey day of the Thames sailing barge.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 01, 2011, 06:02:52 PM
I have given this scene the title of "A quiet Sunday morning." Yes there were times that even I could remember that were like this.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 05, 2011, 02:57:44 AM
I doubt if there is anyone living in Cookham today who would know who was the first resident to have a television set. Well just hit the key below and you will find out.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on December 05, 2011, 10:14:43 PM
Way to go James! Over 75,000 visits to your site.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 27, 2012, 09:42:34 PM
Well folks all the postings to Historiacal Cookham are intact. My last posting was on the 20th of February, and as I have been attending to more important things over the last six weeks, so nothing is lost. Now the dust is about to settle I will be back with more of Cookham and its past.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 19, 2012, 07:37:18 PM
Once again we take a look at Cookham High Street as it was around the late 1800's. Where there was not a motor car in sight, and the surface of the roads through out the village was all gravel. Plus all your shopping needs were within walking distance.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 29, 2012, 07:26:48 PM
I have just found this sample of Modern Cookham History of just about 13 years ago, when I popped into the waiting room of Cookham Station and took this photo. I have just upgraded my computer and this with other photos were discovered in a long forgotten file.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 04, 2012, 09:11:23 PM
Besides this being the Queens Diamond Jubilee. I have been looking back over past Jubilee celebrations and in particular that of the Silver Jubilee of King George V and his Consort Queen Mary. I have included a photo of Queen Mary to show the close resemblance of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth today and that of her grandmother.

Also, I wonder how many know that the 4th of June is a very significant date to a few people. It is known as "Eton Founders Day." Eton College was founded on this date by King Henry VI.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 09, 2012, 08:26:42 PM
We now have the opportunity to go back into the village high street around 1870 and take a look at one of two butcher’s shops that existed in the village at that time. For the more recent residents and visitors to the village, it is now called “The Old Butcher’s Wine Cellar.”
If you look closely at the picture you will notice a black & white dog by the door, eying a leg of lamb hanging on the door frame just out of reach.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 19, 2012, 09:12:53 PM
Now we go back just 78 years ago to a landscape work of Sir Stanley Spencer. As he called them one of his "Pot Boiler's." The scene was the stream at Widbrook fom the bridge looking east. From what I have been told, the Spencer Gallery knows of its exsistance, but have no idea where it is. So I have come up with a photo of that scene as it was painted. How do I know all about it. Well I sat along side him while he was working. Even my mother got concerned that I was bothering him. He said "No, let the boy stay, he is good company."


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 22, 2012, 09:19:57 PM
Another photo that goes back to the 1870's. This time looking east from halfway down the village high street. You can see there are quite a few buildings still standing and that are all worth preserving along with the village history.


http://widbroo2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 28, 2012, 08:58:48 PM
Now we step back only 54 years to 1958. When the area was fairly buzzing with new housing being built, including the pre-fabs were still going up. I am always looking for old photographs of the village so that the village history can be documented and maintained.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 02, 2012, 12:24:04 AM
I have now several photographs taken of Cookham in 1958. It is interesting in this particular photo of a bus coming down the high street. The closest a bus ever got to the High Street is when it crossed the top on Sutton Road on its way between High Wycombe and Windsor Station and all points in between.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 09, 2012, 07:03:13 PM
When some folk think of history and the changes as being very slow indeed. Since the the early 1900's and over the past 100 years, the rate of change could be likened what happened in the previous 900 years. In this blog I have picked a photo of a village cottage taken some 54 years ago. Then a look at the cottage as it is more recently.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on July 09, 2012, 08:34:26 PM
James the photo does not show up on my computer only the text, previous photos are OK though.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 10, 2012, 02:30:13 PM
Sorry to hear about that Roger, it is working alright at this end. It is two stills with a voice over. I guess it could be a number of things. Tell you what, send me your e-mail direct to ve7cij@rac.ca and I will send it to you direct in .wmv


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on July 11, 2012, 12:17:10 PM
I realised why it is not working. I thought it was a photo but it is a video, and I can't access any of your videos as iPads can't read them.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 11, 2012, 02:56:49 PM
I was lead to believe that the I-pad/I-pod was the Apple wonder child that could do everything! So I guess not!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on July 11, 2012, 06:36:11 PM
James, Apple tends to avoid software that is unstable, so they don't suffer from the Microsoft Fatal Error syndrome.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 11, 2012, 07:29:05 PM
In that case you say that Google is unstable as well! As my posting is with Google Blogspot and is uploaded in .mpg format from my AVS4YOU programme which is based in Harley Street, London.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on July 11, 2012, 11:00:55 PM
It is .mpg format that is not supported. .mp4, .mov or .m4v are OK.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 11, 2012, 11:37:24 PM
OK the next time I will use either mp4 or mov. Mind you I can do Blu-Ray if you like.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 15, 2012, 02:57:24 AM
The next two 1958 photographs are stills, so Roger and his fellow I-Podder's can view them without having a problem. They are of Cookham Station. When you could get to High Wycombe faster then than you can today. When there was a pedestrian footbridge over the two railway lines, a signal box and level crossing gates. Also a goods yard where Arthur Hatch and Jim East ran their coal merchant business from. Websters also ran a coal and feed business, but the operation was carried out from Maidenhead. The feed store was where Country Stores now stands.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on July 15, 2012, 12:23:59 PM
Thanks James that works beautifully.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 22, 2012, 05:16:06 PM
Still yet another view of Cookham in the year 1958. This time of Sutton Road looking towards the intersection of School Lane. In this time of fast moving technology, how one is able restore old photos from various sources.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 27, 2012, 03:43:57 AM
Another old photo of Cookham High Street around the 1870's. This time it is Cooper's General Grocers, which later became Budgen's, applying the same trade and it included the General Post Office as well. Both Budgen's and the International Stores served the village, even to bottled beer, wines and spirits. All goods arrived in the stores in bulk and the staff then packaged everything up and put on the shelves.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 30, 2012, 08:37:58 PM
In two days time this blog will have been running for four years. So in this photograph we are looking at barley harvest in Cookham Dean. Well most of it ended up in the local brewing industry and served up in the general pot of ale, which was eqivelent to an imperial quart. So here is a toast to four years of historical blogs.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 01, 2012, 12:30:07 AM
Well here it is the 1st of August and we are able to celebrate this Blogs 4th birthday. During those four years there has been over 80,000 hits on the site. I know it only shows 77,000 plus, but there was a loss of over 3,000 hits when the website colapsed earlier this year. Once again I would like to thank all the followers for their best wishes and help over the past four years.

Regards,

James Hatch


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Jabber on August 02, 2012, 11:29:02 AM
James, I noticed at our old house on School Lane in Cookham both the foundations for a heating oil tank and also an old cess-pit.  I wonder when mains drainage and piped gas came to the village?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 02, 2012, 03:33:14 PM
Hullo Jabber: To answer your question mains drainage was the last thing to happen in Cookham and was not completed until after the second world war. Most houses and buildings were hooked up to the old septic tank or cesspit system, and emptied by the Cookham Rural District Council tankers about every three months for a average family. Piped water was the first to arrive, then gas over a much longer period. Cookham main drains were not completed until the late 1940's, early 1950's. I have covered some of this in an earlier blog. But I will do an update in the near future. Any house built in School Lane prior to the second world war would have had a septic tank or cesspit.

Hope this helps you Jabber.

Here is an update Jabber. The last major sewage project in the village was about 1956 when the houses in Berries Road were finally hooked up. Also at that time a pumping station was installed in the slip field just south of the causeway at its west end.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 07, 2012, 08:09:58 PM
I know that you should be in the height of summer now in Cookham, but there has been winters of severe floods but also long periods of prolonged frost, so much in fact that low lying flooded areas would freeze over into a solid sheet of ice. Over time one finds that weather comes in cycles. There will be periods of long prolonged precipitation, then there will be periods of drought and high temperatures. Anyway enjoy the sheets of ice at Nuttings Farm.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 09, 2012, 12:18:53 AM
I have just spotted a goof I have made. You will find the wet and ice story over on http://victoriavideo1.blogspot.com
Ihope to be back on the right channel for the next time.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 12, 2012, 07:32:17 PM
Recently I discovered this old print by Fred Morgan called "Tug of War." that use to hang in my motherts kitchen when I was a boy living in Widbrook Cottage. As you will see in the first photo it was in a very sad and sorry state from being in storage for a few years. As I have the tools to do restoration of old photos and prints, I was well pleased to restore it to its former glory.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 18, 2012, 12:18:30 AM
Today people think that Supermarkets have been around for ever. Well there was a time when the residents of the three Cookham's relied on family businesses such as the Sartin's for their daily household needs. They would keep very much to the dry goods requirement of the home that would include oil for the lamps. Butchers would take care of meats, including sausages and bacon, while your dairy needs, such as Tuck's in the village would supply milk, butter, cream, eggs and cheese.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 23, 2012, 12:12:19 AM
The photo of Holy Trinity Church back in the late 1800's showing the tower covered in ivy, was taken from from Bell Rope Meadow. Also you can find how the paddock/pasture got its name.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 28, 2012, 06:51:42 PM
I'm in Nova Scotia until the 4th September.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 06, 2012, 03:34:29 AM
Now 92 years ago this Douglas motorcycle was what every young man dreamed of. In my fathers case to get him from job to job.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 09, 2012, 05:01:09 PM
Now we go back to Cookham in the late middle ages, when the Buckingham shore line was open fields and a few trees and the first wooden bridge across the Thames had not been built, neither had Cookham Lock. I knew this print existed, but it has taken me nearly four years to find it.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 12, 2012, 09:14:43 PM
I see that the RBWM have come up with a new idea to recycle more waste. The thing is they could have read it up in their history books. As what they are planning was it full use 72 years ago. Even the local schools were collecting old newspapers and cardboard.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 13, 2012, 08:38:26 PM
Once again we travel back to Cookham in wartime and a all to frequent sound that could be heard from the top of the Fire Station. The Air Raid Siren and dubbed by the local ladies of the village as "Moaning Minnie."


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 17, 2012, 10:56:22 PM
There was a time when filling up your care petrol tank was a slow gravity feed process. Using a manual wobble-pump to feed one of two one gallon glass jars then switching to the second jar while the first jar drained by gravity. The pumps I am describing were installed outside the Kings Arms for the use of guests of the hotel.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 18, 2012, 07:25:18 PM
Still keeping on the village high street theme, and the year of 1895 this time. Mr. Thomas Warboys was the landlord of the Bel and the Dragon Hotel. Also note the size of the pram and the child that is sitting in it.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 21, 2012, 06:50:57 PM
I am now going to take you back 115 years to the first Diamond Jubilee that the village ever celebrated in honour of Queen Victoria. It takes the form of a parade through the village. Once again thanks to the hobby photographer of that time, William Henry Bailey, we have this photo of that event.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 29, 2012, 11:22:10 PM
Once again we go back about 120 years and another photo accorded to William Henry Bailey. This is before Colonel Ricardo and yellow Rolls Royce came on the scene. Also memories of the village road sweeper and his sideline.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 05, 2012, 05:49:57 PM
Once again a well-known village building and for over a hundred years it was a thriving bakery and tea shop in the village, serving the village with all their baked goods needs  and the locals and visitors with delicious cream teas.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 09, 2012, 06:57:32 PM
Two blogs back I mentioned The Village Road Sweeper and now I have come across a photo of such a man working in a village street. Mind you he would have a much harder job today with all the cars parked everywhere. Even his barrow might cause a traffic jam!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 15, 2012, 09:03:20 PM
We now move back in time to a written account of The Parish of Cookham som 150 years ago. It is written in the English of the day. There is a quaint account on the hamlet of Cookham Dean, and I am sure will make a few of todays residents smile.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 20, 2012, 09:14:03 PM
Having grown up in Cookham and being fed its history by parents, grandparents and aunts & uncles. It still gives one a thrill to discover something about the village and the parish life as it was a couple of centuries or more ago. My latest finding about Sir Isaac Pocock goes back over 200 years, and yet his memory is still preserved in Holy Trinity Church. My previous entry gave one a good idea of what made the parish tick. Also I have covered in past blogs, other illustrious residents who made their home here. As I write this I was at school in Cookham with a Philip Pocock! I wonder if he was related?


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on October 24, 2012, 11:45:23 PM
You are great historian James.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 27, 2012, 05:52:19 PM
Thanks Dragonman. Now I have posted a lot of photos attributed to William Bailey. Now to look at other skills of his, and how he made his living as a Painter Decorator in the village. The donkey cart then is what most trades folk used to carry materials and goods to their clients houses.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 30, 2012, 08:48:42 PM
We now take a look at two photos of Cookham High Street within a distance of maybe 50 feet, and yet they are 100 years apart. Click on the picture to enlarge them, so that you can see all the changes, and yet those buildings that have stood the test of time.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 01, 2012, 04:58:27 PM
Here is another then and now blog. This time it about 117 years between each photo. In the first it is the old Cooper's and Budgen's grocery shop. now convertet into twoo shopps.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 03, 2012, 11:00:54 AM
This next photograph is 81 years old and was taken in the vicarage garden that was located on the south side of the building. Rev Canon Bachelor was the vicar at that time and was followed by Rev B.H.Hayward-Browne.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 11, 2012, 05:39:11 PM
Another step back in time. Now to see the changes that have happened over a period of 75 years. Yes it may suprise you that I am a pen and ink artist, which came about when I was into crystal engraving. Anyway, enjoy the changes of time.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 14, 2012, 07:55:23 PM
With grateful thanks to the Bershire Records Office in Reading I am able to bring you a real gem of a find in the appointment of a Toll Collector for Cookham Bridge in the year 1902.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 23, 2012, 12:57:07 AM
Once again with grateful thanks to the Berkshire Records Office I have been able to bring you all a survey map of the village drawn up at the time of the Parish enclosures in1852. If you click on the map you will get a full screen version of the village as it was 160 years ago.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 23, 2012, 10:13:34 PM
I have now taken a 2012 view of the village so that my followers who are no longer resident in the village can compare the changes over a 160 year period.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 24, 2012, 08:41:05 PM
With a new source of the enclosure maps of Cookham I am now able to update information on the commons of Cookham. In this update it is discussed on the two larger parcels of Widbrook and Cockmarsh. Plus an interesting find on a one time property owner the Earl of Orkney.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 28, 2012, 03:49:09 PM
I have just come across an accounting of the Tarry Stone as written by Stephen Darby some 112 years ago. It appears to be the only boundry marker left of the thought to be four such stones.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 02, 2012, 05:39:55 PM
I am now going to bring you the topographical history of the area starting with an area that I know very well indeed, having roamed all these fields as a boy. To understand the area where people are living today is to understand its past. This is the first of quite a few areas that I will be covering. Though there will be a break over Christmas and New Year while I enjoy learning more of the culture of the Maori people of the Cook Islands.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 05, 2012, 09:04:25 PM
Now here is an historical project that can be done over the Christmas period as a family, especially for the recent residents of the village to learn more about your new home from its past. Mind you it would not hurt some of the older residents to refresh their memories.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 08, 2012, 11:36:32 PM
Tomorrow the 9the of December my wife and I take off for our Christmas holiday to Rarotonga in the Cook Islands. Our packing is almost finished and then we look forward to being with our Maori frinds once more. So have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.


http://victoriavideo1.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 16, 2012, 12:58:23 AM
Just to say that cyclone "Evan" missed Rarotonga, though we did have a couple of windy days. At present it is heading for FiJi after giving a severe bashing to Samoa.

Kia Manua to all,

James


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 25, 2012, 06:23:59 AM
This is wish all my followers of my blog, Historical Cookham, a Very Merry Christmas and also a Very Happy and Prosperous New Year. Here I have been looking at parts of the island of Rarotonga that has not changed at all except for the changes of nature, that Captain Cook looked up on all those years ago. It is a good feeling to look at another piece of History. I will be back refreshed in the middle of January.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 17, 2013, 07:56:02 PM
Well now having back from the Sunny South Pacific Islands for a few days, unpacked and sorted out the back log on the computer. One that arrived while I was away and got me thinking was a photo of a very young Lady Nancy Astor and a brand new Rolls Royce car. This triggered my memory to when there were a whole fleet of cars in the garages at Cliveden. I also remember what happened to one of those cars, an American Cord.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Jabber on January 25, 2013, 10:35:18 AM
Hi James

I came across this photo in The Bounty pub - I believe that these are WWII planes that landed behind the pub, maybe the pilots were billeted with the local houses - can you throw any light on the history of this picture.  Sorry for the poor quality!!

(http://i1336.photobucket.com/albums/o654/ajhayter1/BehindtheBountry_zps0d955f7d.jpg)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 25, 2013, 10:30:33 PM
Hi Jabber: Thanks for triggering some more of my memory cells. I have written up my reply to you in my blog, but if it is possible to get a better photo of the aircraft in the foreground it might help. During the war no aircraft could land on Cockmarsh or Widbrook, as the whole area was covered with old wrecks of cars from all the old junk car dealers.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 27, 2013, 07:44:27 PM
Hi Jabber, I have given your photo a clean up and I think I know the second aicraft we were talking about, so see my blog. I have a correction to make.The hotel in question was named The Quarry, and was burnt down in the late 1930's


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 02, 2013, 07:26:51 PM
Now we go back about a hundred and thirteen years when two village families went to school together and because they lived just across the road from one another the boys at least, use to play in the Oveys Farmyard. Yes, my father and Stanley and Gilbert Spencer were childhood playmates.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 06, 2013, 06:58:35 PM
Here is another photo from the William Bailey collection and somewhere about 115 years old. I have added a modern day location map as well so that the recent arrivals in the village will be able to find the spot.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 14, 2013, 02:55:06 AM
This ferry was very popular with summer visitors. Formerly a chain ferry for barge horses, then reduced to a ferry for pedestrian traffic. Like others it met its end in 1956.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 19, 2013, 07:20:36 PM
Here is another William Bailey photo of a lady of the village who had rode her bicycle to the store and placed an order which would be delivered to her home later, also by a trades bicycle. How things have changed from Bill Bailey's day and the photography of today.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 24, 2013, 05:41:42 PM
Once again I have managed to come up withj another interesting photo by William Bailey. It also shows at that time the famous Sarsen stone, known as the "Tarrystone", was residing iun a garden down mill Lane.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 28, 2013, 04:49:33 AM
There has been a lot of hype of late by the RBWM about the rejuvenation of Maidenhead. So i thought I would take some of you both young and old to when Maidenhead was a very lively town. Where ladies from Cookham would catch the Thames Valley bus from the village and get off at the Rialto Cinema and walk to the top the High Street and then start their shopping, working their way back to the Rialto where they new they could catch their bus back to Cookham.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 01, 2013, 10:46:49 PM
Another bit of old Cookham history once again when 'The Three Ferries' was a very popular Sunday afternoon walk for many of the villagers and weekend visitors as well. This photograph was taken sometime in the early 1900's


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 07, 2013, 11:37:05 PM
If you asked a youngster to day if they asked if they knew what a Gill was. The answer would most likely be, "That the name of the little girl down the road!" No I am talking about a measure in the form of a bottle in which milk came to the school for the students to drink every morning.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 12, 2013, 10:56:51 PM
Still with the thought of the bottle of milk, took me back to my Grandmothers cottage in the heart of the New Forest. Remembering as well the milkman arriving with his one horse milk float and my grandmother having all her milk jugs lined up for him to fill. Also her larder with slate shelves.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on March 12, 2013, 11:21:14 PM
Talking about milk there seem to be a lot if adverts for almond milk at the moment. Does anyone know what it is like?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 12, 2013, 11:46:25 PM
Almond Milk Roger has been around for hundreds of years and has a strong use during Lent. Hence you are hearing a lot about it now. Another thing that I have found facinating was to watch the Maori Cook Islanders milk a coconut. It of course is an ingredient that they use in everyday cooking.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 14, 2013, 07:49:58 PM
As you have most likely have read already about the traffic weight restriction that should be applied over Cookham Bridge. This cast my mind back to when the village and a town such as Maidenhead was served very well by the GWR with a delivery service from their goods yards, using a Scammell five wheel articulated lorry as you will see in the photo posted in the blog. It has made me wonder for a long time now, why a system of warehouses were not set up just along side the "M" motorway network, so that smaller vehicles like the Scammell vehicle could make the final delivery to the town or village.
It has worked before, why has it not been implimented again. This way the British minor road structure would not suffer.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 19, 2013, 11:07:17 PM
Like a rare Spencer painting, it is always nice when an old map of the village comes to light thanks to a very good friend and follower of this blog. This is the way the village looked a 173 years ago. Even in those days there was an area called Cookham Marsh, known of course today as Marsh Meadow. So one expected in those days that the river would flood from time to time and the villagers took it in their stride.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 24, 2013, 09:46:49 PM
Here we have another close look at this 1840 map of Cookham. This time paying attention to the Moor and the Eastern part of The Pound.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 28, 2013, 11:07:26 PM
Another view of Cookham High Street of around 1870. It was I am sure before the local photographer William Bailey started his collecftion. It was in a very sad and sorry state in faded sepia tone. Still I think I managed to restore it to a point where one will be able to compare it with the village High Street today.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 04, 2013, 07:12:44 PM
The next posting contains two photographs of the same building and over a hundred years apart. The first showing the village in a peaceful and quiet setting. The second showing the modern day hustle, bustle and noise.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 16, 2013, 12:53:53 AM
I know the weather has not been that great of late. but there was a time in Cookham on a Sunday when a great many people would catch a train out of London to Cookham Station and walk down across the Moor, through the village to Odney common. Then on their return would stop off for a cream tea at Bromley the Bakers in the High Street.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 20, 2013, 09:51:01 PM
Another of William Bailey's photos taken from the moor looking east down the high street. This photo was taken long before a motor car was ever heard of.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 23, 2013, 07:26:20 PM
I have mentioned the three ferry walk before. Here is another William Bailey photo taken most likely on a Sunday afternoon walk.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 26, 2013, 06:40:41 PM
For more than a hundred years this Cookham Public House bore the name "The White Hart." So I have produced a copy of the old pub as it was in the early 1900's with the traditional signboard that use to swing in the wind.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 03, 2013, 03:09:41 AM
There was a time not so long ago when the village did not suffer the roar of traffic, as is depicted in this picture of the village high street.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 09, 2013, 01:18:01 AM
Here is a 106 year old story that come to light in the travels and preservation of a small postcard from Cookham to London and then back again. It also brings to light a entrerprising shopkeeper of that time as well.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 13, 2013, 06:24:36 PM
Right now you are "Rocking on the Moor." Well, a 110 years ago in June it was "Swimming 1n the Moor!. See courtesy of The London Illustraded News, dated 27th June, 1903.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Jabber on May 14, 2013, 01:42:34 PM
Hi James

Is it possible to get copies of some of these old photos you are posting?



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 14, 2013, 06:00:15 PM
Sure Jabber,
Let me know which ones you are interested in. Take a look at my latest posting on Video & Still photography with reference to the RAW format and maybe we can do some swopping, as I do on occasion need an up to date photos of old buildings that will go with my history stories. To save cluttering up this Discussion Page with traffic you can reach me at toastmaster@islandnet.com

Regards,

James Hatch


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 18, 2013, 10:30:25 PM
Once again we travel back way over a hundred years ago and a photo taken in 1906 of the Cookham Cottagers Horticultural and Industrial Society. Which over the years has changed quite a lot dating back to when the village was thriving in the Boot & Shoe Industry.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 23, 2013, 08:54:55 PM
Once again we travel back over a 100 years with a view of this little bungalow, which at one time was called Widbrook Gate. So thanks for a little more recorded information that I have received with many thanks, I am now able to bring you up to date.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 30, 2013, 06:56:15 PM
This tool was in very wide use when I was a very young lad. So here is the history of the Coppin Pruner. Even back in the old days they were using sales slogans!


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 07, 2013, 08:33:04 PM
Carrying on from our last blog with the thought of fruit and apples in particular. This is of course before the refrigerator was common place in every home and your fruit and vegetable fruit supply was very seasonal. The last place that I remember back in the 1930's was the walled-in garden which the Astor's built in the early 1900's.

Remember you can enlarge the photos by clicking on them.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 14, 2013, 12:38:05 AM
What goes around comes around is an old saying. I see that the RBWM is trying to re-invent the wheel, the bicycle wheel! This is being tried all over the world, and where roads are wide enough a 3 foot allocation of road is being marked on either side of the road. Any way to can read my blog.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com

You can enlarge the photo by clicking on it.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on June 14, 2013, 04:03:13 PM
James Cookham has its own bicycle shop and has had for several years.

(http://www.cookham.com/business/shops/baitandtackle/baitan4.jpg)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 14, 2013, 08:18:30 PM
Nice to know Roger, much better than another curry house.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on June 14, 2013, 11:50:55 PM
If it wasn't for James and his little bit of Cookham History, the village as it was would be lost for ever.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 22, 2013, 08:32:24 PM
There has been quite a bit banded about on Nottingham Knockers. It is a shame that an old job-trade should now be reduced to this in the English language and sayings. Anyway to enlighten the young I have posted a picture of a Knocker at work doing a lawful job.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 28, 2013, 06:15:59 PM
It is when people like Jane Kerley writes asking about a person like Betty Ann Binfield that the more recent village history becomes interesting, especially when they are about people that I knew and went to school with, or knew though parents.
I often wonder what happened to people like: Tom & David Elderfield, Peter (Dashing) Brewer, Jim and Jack Packham and a whole string of others, who like myself have spread our wings in search of worldwide adventure.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 03, 2013, 08:21:42 PM
There has been quite a lot of discussion on footpaths, towpaths and rights of way. Going back to a recent posting on the footpath leading off Mill Lane to My Lady Ferry. It was originally there for the barge horse to be brought up after towing the barges up from Maidenhead. From there they would be taken back to their stables at Sheephouse Farm in Maidenhead Court. Mind you during the war years when most people rode bicycles, folks found that the towpath was a pleasant way to travel from Maidenhead to Cookham. Mind you from what I hear today, due to river bank erosion it is hardly safe for walkers.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 08, 2013, 08:57:29 PM
There was something that Birdman said about cutting hedgerows at the wrong time of the year, it triggered my memory back to an old village artisan working at White Place Farm by the name of Neddy James. Using simple hand tools he produced beautiful hedgerows.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 13, 2013, 04:56:32 PM
It seems that one event will follow with another, again the world of nature as it was and as it is now. This time in a follow up from a request by Dr. Phil Baker and Mr. Ben Williams of Reading University, on the lowly Hedgehog.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 20, 2013, 10:46:26 PM
There maybe a few of you who are still living in Cookham that would remember an old school chum of mine, Gerald Effamy who lived in Maidenhead Court. His father was gardener at White Lodge, which now I believe is a residential nursing home. My thoughts go back, especially at this time of the year to the wonderful Tomato and Cucumbers that he used to grow in his large greenhouses. Gerald the last I heard followed his father as a gardener and a well known member of The Royal Horticultural Society and is living in Cobham, Surrey.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 28, 2013, 05:24:41 PM
Looking at all those Cookham Insects by Kingfisher this morning reminder me of the of the original Cookham Fly and its use to those living in the village and Cookham Dean. The Fly was the country version of the Hansom Cab.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 01, 2013, 12:16:03 AM
It doesn't seem that it was five years ago today that we started recording the more recent history of the village. Mind you, it has not been a one man effort, as I have had quite a lot of information passed on to me by many old villagers, who like myself have made their homes else where, though through Cookham.com are able to see what the present day village residents are up to.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on August 01, 2013, 05:52:21 PM
Great work James, you continue to bring back happy childhood memories for us old timers.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 05, 2013, 08:31:55 PM
Thank you Dragonman for your comments. We now go back to 1934 and take a look at the shoe style that ladies were walking out in. Here ladies could catch a bus into Maidehead for sixpence return. Then walk to the top of the town and work their way back down shopping as they went. Then back to the Rialto to catch the bus back to Cookham.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 10, 2013, 05:39:17 PM
Over the past few years I have noticed that grocery stores are moving back to bulk food items. The customer fills a bag, which is provided and then fills it with what amount they require, then seal it with a numbered tag to be weighed and priced at the checkout counter. This took me back to prewar days and the bulk supplies that you could purchase from either Budgen's or The International Store in Cookham. This reminded me of how I acquired and what I did with empty tea chests.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Jo Jo on August 12, 2013, 12:43:31 PM
I don't think I have ever had to seal a bag with a numbered tag.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 12, 2013, 02:57:25 PM
The reason for the numbered tag Jo Jo, is to identify the product when the cashier weighs and punches in the number. At the present time in the store I use, there must be over 300 bulk items on offer. It would be very hard for a cashier to remember that many product numbers.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Jo Jo on August 12, 2013, 11:29:26 PM
Oh, you mean a bar code.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 13, 2013, 12:16:50 AM
Not quite Jo Jo. You see each bulk item is given a four digit number which the customer enters on the special twist tie. When the item gets to the check out the cashier places the bag on the scale and punches the four digit number in and the price is added to your bill. Every so often down the isle there is a stand with an attached pen for you to enter the number on the tags provided. Believe me the system is quick and efficient and much simpler than a bar code in time and expense.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on August 13, 2013, 10:36:16 AM
Next time you're in the country, James, go to the supermarket here. Weigh your items, print out a barcode & stick it on the bag. Simple! No need for pens, 4 digit codes etc.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 13, 2013, 03:15:06 PM
Yes Simes we do have that system here for bulk deli and seafood departments which are operated by the serving staff. It was tried in the dry goods section, but it was found that it was not practical and was confusing to the  non-computer minded AOP. Eventually it will return I am sure, as those of us who are in this category, shed our mortal coil!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Jo Jo on August 13, 2013, 04:18:45 PM
I don't think you could easily use it for seafood and deli. It is really for loose type items  You choose what you want like in Canada and put it into a bag, like in Canada. You then weigh it and on a touch screen choose the product which has little pictures on it. The machine then prints off the label with the products bar code on it. This can then be scanned. Saves lots of time, as the checkout person does not have to weigh the items or type nothing in all they do is scan it, so very accurate. Same concept as Canada but no pen and no typing in and no need for the checkout clerk to weigh the product.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 13, 2013, 04:45:12 PM
Yes Jo Jo , that is fine for those who are computer literate, but it was tried and found wanting, so the stores reverted back to the 4 digit written on a tag for now. Eventually, it will come back I am sure. For now, stores do listen to their older customers requests. As in business, they want to keep everyone happy.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Simes on August 13, 2013, 04:53:41 PM
Not sure you need to be computer literate to touch a picture of a carrot.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 17, 2013, 05:53:41 PM
In the last blog I said that I would return with drawings of how the tea chest was converted into a rabbit hutch. In this case it is how one constructed a breeding hutch.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on August 17, 2013, 11:58:40 PM
I hear that people are using old pallets now for rabbit hutches, sofas, you name it.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 18, 2013, 12:10:00 AM
Home recycle has always been my motto Roger, and if I made a Bob or Two in the process as a young lad, one got to learn the value of money. Plus I got a business sense at a very early age.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 24, 2013, 12:55:45 AM
Still bulk buying from the local grocers, this time it is biscuits and most likely from Huntley and Palmers. It was always my delight when I had a few pennies in my pocket to ask if there were any broken biscuits that I could buy? There was always a few at the bottom of the tin. So for two pence or three pence I could have a nice bag of biscuits.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 31, 2013, 12:46:00 AM
With Autumn fast approaching one has to bear in mind that there will be the possibility of flooding again in Cookham. Years ago the then Thames Conservancy did their very best to keep the waterways to the River Thames free and clear of weed growth. One thing the Water Authority will we are short of money! Even so, The Thames Conservancy was in the same boat in the 1930's. Take a look at these two photos I have posted of then and now. I can tell you that "Swallows and Amazons," had nothing to the pleasure that I had on the stream at Widbrook.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 04, 2013, 03:04:53 AM
Once again we were back in the 1930,s and it is the height of summer. Every Saturday and Sunday "Old Joe, as we knew him would cycle from Maidenhead to Cookham with his Wall's Ice Cream Tricycle. His favourite pitch was down by the pool at Odney to serve his customers. He would also turn out and come to the Cookham Flower Show when it use to be held down Mill Lane. This was a tradition from the days of Col. Ricardo.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on September 06, 2013, 12:51:15 PM
Yes, I remember those 3d Choc Ice Creams well James.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 18, 2013, 06:48:54 PM
For the past two weeks I have been away in Nova Scotia, so I have had little chance for research for the Historical Blog.
In this next blog I have gone back to the early 1900's, when my father and his cousins loved jumping into the pool from that tower.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 22, 2013, 11:52:15 PM
The topic of conversation recently got around to celebrities that have visited Cookham on various occasions, the enquiry of Diana Dors who also was a frequent visitor to Bel & Dragon and the Torquil. Another person who spent about three weeks in the village while filming along Cliveden Reach, was Jimmy Edwards whose characters were well known on radio.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on September 25, 2013, 06:56:40 PM
Congratulations James! With all your hard work and effort it is nice to see you hit the hundred thousand mark!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 28, 2013, 07:35:13 PM
First off, thank you Dragonman for your kind words. I have been giving a lot of thought lately to English life as it was back in the late 1800's to the early 1900's and how our style of language as changed with the loss of a lot of old country dialects. I have entitled this blog "Gossip Joan." After an old English Folk Song.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 03, 2013, 07:23:27 PM
I have been experimenting with a new way of presenting the story of the village history. Going from the written word to the spoken word. Also it allows me to add the odd written pointer as well.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on October 04, 2013, 02:15:04 PM
Although having a verbal dialogue is nice, I would really miss the written word. It is so useful if you are looking through for information and having to play through searching for something on sound only would be really frustrating. I do hope you continue to do your write ups James.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 04, 2013, 03:26:34 PM
Thanks for your comments Roger. This idea of mine is in the experimental stage. Even at my ripe old age one has to keep going forward. I remember from my old school days being taught to always keep learning. To think that you know everything is to stall at the status quo and you will go backward. So Roger I will take your message under advisement and try a combination of both. Though I am still open for other constructive suggestions.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 11, 2013, 12:00:20 AM
In the last blog I spoke of The Torquil Restaurant in the village. Now we switch to where Maggie and Reg Moon made their home and during the day made his pots. Before that it was a little greengrocers, which stretched back into the 1930's.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 13, 2013, 09:38:04 PM
From all the reports I am receiving it seems that my new way of presenting the history of Cookham is very popular with those following my blog. This one shows the top half of the village as it was in 1935. It also gives me a chance to talk about the people who were connected with those buildings at that time.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 18, 2013, 10:01:24 PM
Tidleywink the Barber I have touched on before. As this building has seen quite a few changes in my lifetime. So I have added a voice over to the blog.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 24, 2013, 11:14:26 PM
I have done a written story of the village chemist shop before in the blog, but now I can add a voice over one can get the feeling of what these old village members were like, and I am able to paint a verbal picture of these old village characters.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 31, 2013, 11:40:39 PM
A modern day photo of Elizabeth House and its history in a voice over recalling some of the people who lived and worked there in years gone by.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 06, 2013, 07:09:22 PM
As we are fast approaching the 11th of November, and that in my researches I have come up with to stories that should be told about the same family living in Cookham and covering both world wars. As we remember other members of the village who lost their lives.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 09, 2013, 07:58:32 PM
As I mentioned in the previous preamble that I would bring up a little more interesting facts about the Briggs family who lived for quite a number of years in Walnut Tree Cottage. Also the exploits of Captain Briggs in the first world war.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 15, 2013, 11:59:41 PM
For quite some time now I have had this poem or ballad sitting on my desk just waiting for me to find a way to present it. Since I have perfected a way to present my blog with a voice over, then to find pictures that complemented the phrases of the ballad of Cookham as it was some 200 years ago. Stretching from the London to Bath road. Maidenhead Thicket to Bisham and bounded back by the river to the Bath Road.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 23, 2013, 12:34:11 AM
We now go back to 1937 and the Cookham Flower Show when before the war it was always held on the grounds of the Odney Club. The photograph was kindly sent to me by my old school chum and distant relative Brian Hatch, whose father Arthur is in the group.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 30, 2013, 02:59:57 AM
This time using two photographs taken from  the same general location in the high street and about 125 years apart.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 06, 2013, 10:32:07 PM
This is to say we are off on our annual holiday to the Cook Islands on Sunday and will be back on the 19th of January. So I hope to have more history for you when I return  toward the end of January.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 18, 2014, 11:43:11 PM
This just to let you know that we are on our way back to our home in Victoria tonight. Look for more history in a week or so.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 26, 2014, 01:45:19 AM
I have for quite some time been collecting material and photos of the family. So now is the time to add another leaf to the Hatch family history before it gets lost forever.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 30, 2014, 08:50:49 PM
This still to which I have added a voiceover is about 124 years old. When the milking herd of Oveys Farm use to roam and graze on The Moor or Odney Common. Once again I tribute this photo to the work of William Bailey who lived in the High Street.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 02, 2014, 05:45:46 PM
There has been so much been aired on the discussion board lately on what I call the normal flooding of the area when large amounts of precipitation  in both the local and upper Thames catchment area. Which by the way covers the Chiltern's and quite a lot of the Cotswold's. If you choose to ignore this factor, which by the way no water authority or local government can change. You then remind me of that Aesop fable of "The Grasshopper and The Ant."


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on February 08, 2014, 03:05:06 PM
It makes me wonder! How did the village survive without computers and cell phones?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on February 12, 2014, 05:56:29 PM
I think it time to take another look at this once more.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on April 14, 2014, 11:29:06 PM
Hullo James where are you? I find that you have not posted here lately!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 15, 2014, 09:47:53 PM
Hi Dragonman. No I am still here, except I moved to Google Chrome and I have lost my access into the Cookham Blogger. Just for Historical Cookham. Still I will get back there as soon as I find the answer.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 13, 2014, 03:11:57 AM
There has been quite a lot of conversation about The Pound. So I thought I would put the matter to rest with a Map of circa 1842 That about 11 years before the railway was put through from Maidenhead to High Wycombe.

I forgot to add left click on the bottom right of the map to make it full screen.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: EUWAVE on July 13, 2014, 04:41:21 PM
James I followed the link you posted and it states that the water that runs under the Causeway Bridge across the Moor is called the Fleet. This is in-correct, that piece of water is in fact called the Strand Water.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on July 13, 2014, 05:07:53 PM
I have lived in Cookham all my life -70 years plus and it has always been known as 'The Fleet'


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 13, 2014, 06:14:21 PM
Sorry EUWAVE, I am afraid that Monty is correct about The Fleet. Strand Water is that section of the stream that was excavated and widened at the time that Strand Castle (now demolished) was built.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on July 13, 2014, 07:00:57 PM
Thank you James for confirming The Fleet have walked over that bridge going to school etc more times than I care to count.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Ellie on July 13, 2014, 07:19:11 PM
Both James and Monty are correct, as both titles have been in use in Cookham for a very long time.

'Fleet' in this sense is an ancient word often used for an area of water which floods quickly, but the flood can also disappear fairly rapidly, which seems applicable here.

The Strand water was a medieval fishing stream, listed in documents a few hundred years before it was widened for the benefit of Strand Castle.

It is unfortunate that both these names are not made clear on undetailed modern maps - rather the same problem as we are suffering with the name of the road across The Moor.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: EUWAVE on July 14, 2014, 10:07:56 AM
I can see the references to the name Fleet however I cannot find it on any maps; my ordnance survey map shows the name Strand Water as far up as the back of Sutton Farm, at this point the channel narrows dramatically. Is this where it becomes the Fleet? I like to cycle and normally swear by the OS as being the most accurate reference point to follow, so a little surprised it does not show the name Fleet.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 19, 2014, 09:00:54 PM
As the summer weather has arrived in Cookham and the start of walking groups seem to be the thing to do. I have put you to start looking for signs of Historical significance while walking or riding your bicycle.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: EUWAVE on July 20, 2014, 09:48:00 AM
James can you pinpoint where exactly Strand Water ends and The Fleet begins, I cannot find any maps referencing the name The Fleet?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Cervantes on July 20, 2014, 03:23:35 PM
Strand water is privately owned so has very definite boundaries. I believe it starts at the wooden bridge in the north just south of moor hall and ends at the T-junction in the south. I would post a pic but I can't work out how you guys do that :-)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 20, 2014, 03:48:54 PM
EUWAVE. I have a section of a recent map which shows where Strand Water starts and finishes, together with the location of the old concrete folly known as Strand Castle, now of course demolished. I also have another map of that body of water on Cookham Moor known as The Fleet. The stream connecting The Fleet to  Strand Water is Widbrook Stream which wends its way across Widbrook Common and joins the Thames at Islet Park. Various cartographers have made the same maps and have injected their own names. The word Widbrook comes from the old word for Willows which is Widdie or Withie depending in which part of the country you are in due to local dialect. I will post that map in the near future.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 20, 2014, 04:27:32 PM
The widening of Widbrook Stream at that point known now as Strand Water the land to the west of the stream was owned by the builder of Strand Castle. Then in and around 1906-10 the Astor family bought all that land from the stream al the way to  and including Lightlands. South from Danes Manor to the Camp Grounds. The wooden bridge was installed so that farm machinery could cross the stream from the Astor land of Moor Hall.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: brillo on July 21, 2014, 02:51:13 PM
I was born in Cookham in the 1940s and have always known the pond on the Moor as the Fleet as did my mother who spent her whole life in Cookham.
Strand Water ran from the southern end of the fleet to the footbridge the other side of Strand Lane.


 


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 21, 2014, 07:09:25 PM
I have put together a You Tube with a map out lining the history of Strand Water.

http://youtu.be/R5XzPiMlKBk



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on July 21, 2014, 07:53:24 PM
As a fellow Cookhamite and my mother as well it was always known as The Fleet


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Cervantes on July 21, 2014, 11:28:15 PM
(http://s26.postimg.org/chisfetwp/image.jpg)

Strand Castle from the West Bank.

(http://s26.postimg.org/a1gz1kbu1/image.jpg)

Moor Hall sales document showing the Strand Castle lot (complete with moat) and part of the waterway.

(http://s26.postimg.org/q0zml47vt/image.jpg)

Maidenhead Advertiser report on a brief history of the waterway

Hope the quality is good enough. I have the complete document for moor hall if anyone is interested.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Cervantes on July 21, 2014, 11:29:05 PM
Sorry to double post but the sales doc is from 1916


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 22, 2014, 01:20:11 AM
Well done Cervantes. I have now  included a map of The Moor which includes Fleet and The Fleet Bridge. Once again I have used YouTube:

http://youtu.be/RC0a1OTGSfU


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 22, 2014, 02:44:45 PM
Sorry if you did not get the YouTube  map if you tried earlier, but I have now fixed the glitch.


http://youtu.be/RC0a1OTGSfU


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 25, 2014, 11:31:40 PM
Quite a bit has been mention about the fish that use to frequent the Widbrook Stream. Now I am going back to the 1930's and 40's, when the stream was part of my life. Including the fish that one could catch. Then with coming of a pesticide 24D. It seems that it had an effect on the water and the fish population.


http://youtu.be/21ohzrFj8YQ


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Cervantes on July 26, 2014, 02:34:33 PM
Thanks James the pics will help id the ones I see next time I'm walking. Hopefully the stock will return with today's laws on water quality.

On a related note there appears to be a terrapin living in the stream behind moor hall. Does anyone know what they eat? He's been there a few years now and has grown quite large so I wondered what he might be living on. Always covered in duck weed when I see him :-).


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 26, 2014, 03:25:44 PM
Thanks for your remarks Cervantes, I think posting a You Tube is a good way to pass information. As for your sighting of a Terrapin. It most likely was a pet that someone had released. It reminds me quite a lot of our "Snapping Turtle." It is most likely living on a diet of frogs and newts.

Further research, I find that the European Pond Turtle is a close kin to the North American Snapping Turtle and can live in the wild up to 30 years. In captivity 40 years is quite common.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 28, 2014, 01:00:59 AM
Once again that time of the year has come around once more. For on the 1st of August, 2014. The Historical Cookham Blog will be six years old. Once again I would like to thank all those of you who helped and assisted in providing material and information. We have just passed the 120,000 mark on the scoreboard. Which of course has made the whole exercise worth while.


http://widbrook2.blogspot.com


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 02, 2014, 10:39:28 PM
As we are now six years old I have decided to update the blog presentation with more of a vocal presentation, as I continue to think back to when I was a boy growing up in the village. I have made this first accounting 3 minutes long.

Sorry about the glitch, but I am having problems with the blog posting. So I had to resort to YouTube.


http://youtu.be/5zkG8G6IVj0


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 31, 2015, 08:21:17 PM
Yes I have not posted anything Historical for quite a while. The I came across in You Tube and I remember it was a favourite 45 disc among the Cookham young 63 years ago.
This was top of the hit parade 63 years ago, and what was known as a 15 minute wonder. It is called “It’s in the book.”
http://youtu.be/poCWRJTgMQU
So turn up your sound and enjoy.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 24, 2015, 09:14:29 PM
Where are they now? Some I know are still living in or not far from Cookham. Some I know, like myself have travelled much further. So here are a few that I joined at Holy Trinity School some 80 years ago.

Brian Wooten, Jennie Gore, Brian Hatch, Jean White, Joy Deacon, Ronald Barker, Elsie Hales, Ruth Wadhams, Kathleen Thorp, Peter Cracknell, Reginald Lewendon, Ronald Honour, Robert Edwards, Roy Wilsdon, James Packham, William Burnap, Daphne Spencer, Peter Fisher, Olive Barnes. Plus the wild twins! “Thomas & David Elderfield.”

This is but a few that I remember.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on February 25, 2015, 06:02:50 PM
Hey! James,  your memory goes way back! Who would not remember the Elderfield twins!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 05, 2015, 03:28:14 PM
Hey Dragonman cast your mind back, do you remember a John Stanley Vale, who lived in the High Street at a house called "The Nest." John's mother kept the little sweet shop next the shoe repairer in the High Street. If he is still with us he would be about 87 now.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on March 07, 2015, 02:42:52 PM
Ah Yes, Johnny Stanley who use to have quite a large selection of Dinky Toys. He also use to tip us off on what goodies his mother had put in her famous "Bran Tub!"


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 08, 2015, 07:54:11 PM
One other school mate that comes to mind is, Jim Packham. Who if my memory serves me correct, use to live in Woodland Cottages.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on March 10, 2015, 01:52:53 PM
Yes, I remember Jim. He also had an elder brother Jack.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 11, 2015, 03:49:27 PM
Now here is another village character that some may remember. Ethel Gordon? The chain smoking post lady, who had very strong political opinions!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on March 12, 2015, 04:20:26 PM
Yes I remember her quite well! Oh by the way mate I see by the Webmaster that you have chalked up another milestone! Well as you know I am just a few months behind you.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: graham23 on May 18, 2015, 02:01:14 PM
Hi James I am looking for any info on the Whitbread family can you help


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 18, 2015, 05:08:05 PM
Hello Graham23, Well I have researched my memory on Whitbread, but drew a blank. In the W's I remembered, Wooten, Wadhams, Whitlock, Winterbottom, Wall, Walker, Westcot, Webb & Woolford. These were in my school days of the 30's & 40's. But don't give up as someone else may come up with information.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: graham23 on May 18, 2015, 11:11:10 PM
Hi James how about a Gladys Hare from graham road


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 18, 2015, 11:33:36 PM
Sorry Graham23, The closest girl I can remember to that name was an evacuee with the name Barbara Hayes in 1939, and was billeted in School Lane.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: graham23 on May 20, 2015, 12:36:26 PM
Hi James thanks  Gladys would have been in her mid 30s in 1939, Robert Hare was killed in action 1918 she then lived with her parents the Whitbread's in Kelle cottage Graham road till ? then moved with someone (male) to Iver in buckingham


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 20, 2015, 04:41:43 PM
Yes, sorry Graham23. I was more familiar with people living in the village at that time in 1939. It wasn't till 1941 that I started st the secondary school in High Road, that I got to know more people.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 23, 2015, 03:20:47 PM
There is 105 years time difference between these two photos taken from the same location in the village. It will give the more recent village resident a good idea of how little in some cases the village has changed. As good subjects come to light I hope to show more examples.

https://youtu.be/xTLFPWCY3f8


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 30, 2015, 09:57:15 PM
It seems that two things go together this weekend. There is a Ticketed walk at Hedsor Wharf. I come up with a water colour by William Havell which is 203 years old.

https://youtu.be/Q26Ma35LLH0



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 03, 2015, 11:01:59 PM
We now take a birds eye view of the change that has taken place in the middle part of Cookham over the past 165 years. Most of the major changes have occurred during the past 65 of those years.


https://youtu.be/VVWKypNq7JI


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on June 10, 2015, 02:25:53 PM
I've just taken a look at this James. Can you come up with more like this? It is very interesting.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 23, 2015, 08:57:13 PM
Well here you are Dragonman. This time I have moved just west of the village to take in the Pound or Pound Field as it was call in 1842. Most of the extended housing has been since the second world war. From this you can see why one has to put the clamps on further building before the village will lose its identity.


https://youtu.be/A0wh7O91cRE


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on June 23, 2015, 09:13:27 PM
That is excellent James.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 23, 2015, 11:39:02 PM
Thank you Roger.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on June 26, 2015, 08:01:38 PM
I concur with Roger, though in 1842 there was little chance of an accident that Paris reported.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 30, 2015, 05:41:01 PM
History: A Poem To Which I Can Relate 
I remember the spam of my childhood,
And the bread that we cut with a knife,
When the children helped with the housework,
And the men went to work not the wife.
 
The cheese never needed a fridge,
And the bread was so crusty and hot,
The children were seldom unhappy
And the wife was content with her lot.
 
I remember the milk from the bottle,
With the yummy cream on the top,
Our dinner came hot from the oven,
And not from a freezer; or shop.
 
The kids were a lot more contented,
They didn't need money for kicks,
Just a game with their friends in the road,
And sometimes the Saturday flicks.
 
I remember the shop called Budgens,
Where biscuits for pennies were sold
Do you think I'm a bit too nostalgic?
Or is it....I'm just getting old?
   
Bathing was done in a wash tub,
With plenty of rich foamy suds
But the ironing seemed never ending
As Mother pressed everyone's ‘duds’
I remember the slap on my backside,
And the taste of soap if I swore
Anorexia and diets weren't heard of
And we hadn't much choice what we wore.
 
Do you think that bruised our ego?
Or our initiative was destroyed?
We ate what was put on the table
And I think life was better enjoyed.
 
Author: Unknown I think. If you can remember those days…continue to enjoy your retirement ;D ;D ;D


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on July 01, 2015, 12:39:16 AM
Great piece of poetry James. 'The Gafa,' would have enjoyed reading this.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 02, 2015, 03:21:42 PM
Now we go back to Maidenhead 1930, as I was there! Yes believe it or not it is known fact children learn more in the first five years of life, and retain memories than in later life.

https://youtu.be/tmX0LyuWx64

As the building is no more and photos were not plentiful I had to make this one up from scratch!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 31, 2015, 08:24:24 PM
Here we are once again coming into August and the seventh year that I have been posting to Historical Cookham. Over the past years I have moved from the written word to short video clips of old still photos of the village to which I have added a narration. I remember when I was seven very well. That was the year that Stanley Spencer painted the Moor and Village from the Fleet Bridge.

https://youtu.be/SOIF7zxivOQ



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on August 02, 2015, 09:51:48 PM
Wow James! Is that long? I do like your new method of postring with that little personal touch.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 10, 2015, 09:32:30 PM
Now I am going to reflect on the history of Cookham's common lands starting with Widbrook Common, an acreage that I know well.

https://youtu.be/h9drIp6mKwU


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on August 13, 2015, 11:21:41 PM
Very good James but, you forgot one other Hayward, It was Arthur Jakes JP. He followed on after George for a short time.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 14, 2015, 07:55:37 PM
You are right Dragonman. Yes, he use to live if my memory is correct at 24 Australia Avenue, in Maidenhead.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 16, 2015, 09:03:41 PM
We now move on to the second part of Widbrook Common and surrounding fields and farms, starting back to around 1900 and up to 1950. There will be reflecting pieces to follow to this as I go into exacting detail.
This clip is covered in a 10 minute narration, so turn up your sound.

https://youtu.be/Pffs6g97Q_w


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on August 17, 2015, 04:11:00 PM
Doing well James, keep them coming. It is interesting how the village was run without computers!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 18, 2015, 02:25:35 PM
Again I have stepped back in time with a photo most likely by William Bailey. This photo was  taken shortly after the bridge was built around 1900. It has been narrated, so turn up your sound.

https://youtu.be/wC8cXRxCfoU


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 22, 2015, 08:59:06 PM
Once again with this view of widbrook stream as it was kept up by the Thames Conservancy, also there is note there for nature lovers on the wild life that existed in the 30's and 40's. Then the picture is also resembles an oil painting of Stanley Spencer painted in 1934. It was one of his pot boilers. Now it is missing from the records of his work.

https://youtu.be/Qe1cTW3VMBM


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 28, 2015, 09:17:00 PM
One more thing about Widbrook and the Pollard Willow from where it gets its name. I am after preserving village history. Remember, that back in the middle ages the villagers fought long and hard for their commoners rites from Elizabeth 1. This is why I have put this little clip together to show what Widbrook West could look like in a few years after the trees were planted.

https://youtu.be/xIZibip6VLs



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on September 13, 2015, 01:11:37 AM
Have you had any indirect response to the planting of Willow trees from anyone. After all I thought most people were in favour of more tree planting in our green  areas.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 05, 2015, 09:11:48 AM
Hopefully I will have more information when I get back from the South Pacific early in the New Year Dragonman.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 03, 2016, 09:09:45 PM
I was drawn to the remarks posted on the latest flora and fauna photo by Kingfisher, and the comment that it would be nice to see photos of the older building that are worth preserving. I have been tied up of late with my newfound hobby of using a GoPro camera and with flying a drone. So with I went back to an old Bill Bailey photo of about 1899, together with a recent photo taken from the same position.

https://youtu.be/FASPZxmSFpc


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 13, 2016, 10:33:05 PM
We now move the west end of the village High Street with another Then and Now photo stills, so you can note the changes.

https://youtu.be/I80jN_TnDH4


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on February 14, 2016, 12:17:43 AM
James' Historical Cookham is seven years old. That is incredible. Doesn't time fly when you are having fun?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 14, 2016, 12:54:06 AM
Yes it does Roger, as a matter of fact I can remember Black Butts Cottages being built in 1934. Or treading the boards of the Pinder Hall for the first time 1936, In "Hey Diddle-Diddle." and singing a duet "Lavenders Green." with a pretty blonde with the name of Joan Wainscott. No there are not many of us around these days who would remember Mrs. Adams, Mrs. Snapes, Mrs. Evans and Miss, Collins, with Mrs. Stanton as substitute teacher. Ah! Roger, those were memorable days indeed. I guess I owe those ladies a lot!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 22, 2016, 06:35:40 PM
We now move to another "Then and Now," reflection on three buildings at the east end of the High Street. What they use to house and what they are today. It also reflects on people who use to live in the village and their contribution to its history.

https://youtu.be/p5LSufCGq7Y


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on February 22, 2016, 08:14:01 PM
I am getting a message that I can no longer see this video as the account has been terminated


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 22, 2016, 09:01:19 PM
Thanks for the heads up Roger. I have just changed e-mail accounts due to a cyber attack on my old server. So Google has the idea that I have pirated my original account. So I have to go back and get them to unlock it.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 23, 2016, 05:12:33 PM
Once again thanks Roger. I have been in touch with Google and after a lot of security checks. The posting has now been restored. The next one have in the works is the Old Police Station, now of course it is "Elizabeth House Senior Centre." Ah yes! there are some good village tales to be found there.

https://youtu.be/p5LSufCGq7Y


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on February 23, 2016, 07:28:35 PM
Thanks for that James. I believe that Kate Swan was the daughter of Bromley's the baker.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 27, 2016, 10:38:21 PM
Our "Then & Now," swings westward towards the Railway Station and to the old Police Station and what it is today.


https://youtu.be/XHL50loWdtQ


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 07, 2016, 10:17:53 PM
This clip I have called it "Then." The reason is due to the fact that there were too many cars blocking the view of the  buildings today. Also before someone mentions the fact that I forgot to mention the Green's who ran the Post Office in the shop that use to be Loveridge the Barber in West Flint.


https://youtu.be/EePaR4Y87L8


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 08, 2016, 11:07:07 PM
After I had posted the last "Then." I got to thinking about Reg and Maggie Moon and how they had moved to Henley in Arden. Well they had made quite a name for themselves in the Pottery business, and together there was a couple of photos of Reg working in his studio in Cookham. So sound on and take a trip back in time.

https://youtu.be/fXrTIjnZvBE



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on March 09, 2016, 06:48:51 PM
Yes I can remember the little shop in the High Street.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on March 09, 2016, 09:03:23 PM
I used to work for Reg and Mag Moon in in the Torquil coffee shop when I was 16 a really nice couple.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 19, 2016, 06:55:45 PM
When Whist Drives were King! During World War 2, entertainment was very much a make your own affair. One way the villagers could get together and yet be productive was holding a Whist Drive. The prizes were given in a fifteen shilling savings certificates for the top lady and gentleman player, and smaller saving stamp prizes. There were Whist Drives nearly every night at the following locations: The Women’s Institute in Cookham Dean at the old site in Kennel Lane, The Working Men’s Club, by the Station in the upstairs room. At Moor Hall, in the large dining-room and run by Miss Freda Salberg. In Maidenhead, at the old Town Hall in the High Street and one other small club in Marlow Road, Maidenhead, the name of which escapes me at the moment, and from looking at Marlow Road today, that building has vanished. One regular player that seldom missed a game was Mrs. May Harris, the mother of Gordon Harris, who always insisted that she play gentleman. Mind you my mother did not miss many either. As I use to accompany her to the ones in the village. Even to walk from Widbrook to the WI in Kennel Lane and back. Yes folks walk! That is when a lot of villagers walked.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: K.J.G. on March 20, 2016, 09:03:08 AM
I think that was the Ivey Leaf Club James.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 20, 2016, 04:25:10 PM
Yes KJG, you are quite right. It was a long low wooden structure with clapboard sides. The last group that I heard of using it was the Maidenhead & District Cycle Club, of which Jack Webb who lived in Sleekstone Cottages in the late 1940's. He was farm mechanic at White Place Farm after Ernie Holland had died.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on March 23, 2016, 10:52:37 PM
There was a time not so long ago when petrol for your car was rationed and most village car owners were forced to walk! Some who had money to spare invested in a contraption that looked like a barrage balloon on top of the car filled with coal gas. There were one or two in Cookham, but most people walked or rode a bicycle.


https://youtu.be/M1HcJJT4Mz8



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 08, 2016, 12:11:51 AM
There are very few of us left now that can remember when horses were part of farm life in the village. Tom Emmett the blacksmith was kept busy making shoes for working horses of White Place Farm. It was at White Place farm that the first agricultural tractor came into use to take over from them. Here is the story of the first three tractors to arrive at White Place Farm.


https://youtu.be/UJeXccM34gM


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on April 09, 2016, 05:53:03 PM
Nice photos and story James. I can remember when Bob Caught had a David Brown which young Peter Taylor use to drive.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on April 14, 2016, 02:06:55 AM
Yes Dragonman I remember that David Brown. I have also some good stories and memories of driving the Standard Motor Companies Ferguson, and its inventor Harry Ferguson. More on that when I return from the East Coast.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 04, 2016, 02:52:28 AM
Well Dragonman I'm back from the East Coast. While away I thought I would tickle a few memories of some of the older residents of Cookham and of the village we all grew up in. Some of you would have been thrust into the village as the result of World War II. I often think of those times when I have watched the movie: "Good Night Mr. Tom." With that great and sadly missed actor John Thaw. So here a new way to tell the story of Cookham.


https://youtu.be/5QXCtRiqh-U


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on May 05, 2016, 03:50:22 PM
Hey James, that brings back a lot of memories! When are you going to publish the next story?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 06, 2016, 08:52:22 PM
Here you are Dragonman, and I am sure you will remember the word Scrumping! Plus a little more of village history.

https://youtu.be/HWOTClB-QtY


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on May 18, 2016, 07:54:05 PM
Hey James! When is the short story coming out?


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 29, 2016, 09:30:34 PM
I am still experimenting with ways to produce my various stories of people and places that I grew up with in the village and surrounding area. So each one that I produce will have some change or other. Turn on your sound for the story of the Shoe Repair Shop and the Bran Tub.


https://youtu.be/PImp2nQ8P70


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on June 11, 2016, 09:37:41 PM
I see you have just posted another video and still camera shot. When are you going to come up with another historical story? As they seem to get very well read.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 12, 2016, 07:42:58 PM
Hi Dragonman at the moment I am working on an 88 year old memorial and ways the village can preserve this wonderful edifice. Also I am looking for photos of the village in the 1940-50's. Just scan the originals and I can do the rest. If any GI's that were stationed here and have photos, it would be great.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 15, 2016, 02:44:20 PM
Here you are Dragonman, turn up your sound and listen to this piece of more recent history that needs preserving.

https://youtu.be/AvUlqOb0rTI


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on June 17, 2016, 06:51:47 PM
Nice one James, but I somehow don't think there is another benefactor like Mrs. Allan in the wings. After all, it only lasts for a week or ten days at the most. As you know we old timers just took it in our stride. We even all walked to school in welly boots!


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on June 17, 2016, 07:27:09 PM
If we are talking about \mrs Allen that lived in Elmstead at the bottom of the village next to Henry Chemist shop my mother worked for her doing housework


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on June 17, 2016, 07:34:30 PM
Does anyone remember Miss Stanton 1st class teacher at Holy Trinity, Miss Drew, Mr Jenkins Headmaster Mrs Snapes. The Boiler with the guard round on wet days to dry out coats and milk


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Bob on June 17, 2016, 08:39:51 PM
Dragonman, I agree with you that we oldies always took the floods in our stride and still do. All part of the rich tapestry of Cookham life that we were happy to put up and we enjoyed the changes it brought. I still get the same feeling of excitement when they are here that I did as a child.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 17, 2016, 09:03:12 PM
The Mrs. Allan at Elmstead, Monty, was the mother of Nina, Godfrey and Peter. Her husband Alwyn was in the RAF during the war, and was a member of the John Lewis Partnership.
Mrs. Stanton lived in a bungalow at the back of the Kings Arms. The Miss Drew you mentioned was also sister to Dolly Drew who taught at the Top School, and traveled from Wargrave every day by train. The Mrs. Balfour Allan, I think lived at Lodene Grays, next door to St George's Lodge and is now part of the John Lewis Partnership. I know that before the war she paid for a end of school party in July and Christmas. The food was catered by Bromley's in the High Street.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on June 17, 2016, 09:17:21 PM
I think I must have started school at Holy Trinity in 1945 I remember going to school in a boat in 1947 and the flood waters can=me up to out outside toilet in Terrys Lane where \I lived with my grandparents Fred and Mary Robinson


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 21, 2016, 12:09:33 AM
The next piece of my Cookham History corcerns not only a lot of Cookham villagers, but quite a lot people both in the UK and in America. Nancy Witcher Langhorn, better known to everyone including  Sir Winston Churchill as Lady Nancy Astor, member of parliament for Plymouth and the first woman sit as a member in Westminster.

https://youtu.be/IRhF_FNA26w



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Roger on June 21, 2016, 12:29:30 AM
Lady Nancy Astor by John Singer Sargeant

(http://lowres-picturecabinet.com.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/115/main/5/349188.jpg)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 27, 2016, 08:34:53 PM
We now move back to the village high street and that of another artist of the village, this time not in oils or water colours, but in wrought iron.

https://youtu.be/ID_dylZcZXM


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on June 28, 2016, 03:04:30 PM
How do you do it James, you certainly captured old Tom's drawling voice.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 29, 2016, 03:59:21 PM
I think Dragonman, it all goes back to when I was a nipper and I use to mimic characters that I heard on the radio in children's hour and other programmes, like Toy Town, with Larry the Lamb, and his little whaling voice. Or the stern voice of Ernest the Policeman.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 02, 2016, 12:19:32 AM
My Thoughts of late have been reflecting once more on my school days at Holy Trinity and later at the Secondary Modern on High Road, better known back then as The Top School. One of the subjects that were on the curriculum was singing. Most of our teachers could play the piano. The songs that we were taught covered most of the well-known English Folk Songs. One of which I have used to give a title to this blog. The opening verse I still remember well:
Good morrow, Gossip Joan,
Where have you been a-walking?
I have for you at home;
I have for you at home
A budget full of talking,
Gossip Joan.
The style of the wording of the lyrics also brought home to us the English of the day when it was first written. Another folk song that I enjoyed because of the descant in it was:
 “A Keeper did a hunting go.”
Jackie Boy - Master
Sing you well - Very well
Hey down-ho down, derry derry down
Among the leaves so green-o
To my hey down down- To my ho down down
Hey down-ho down, derry derry down
Among the leaves so green-o
Also during those singing lessons that the vicar used to attend to recruit choristers for the church choir. Ah! Happy Memories!



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 10, 2016, 06:40:06 PM
My thoughts are still with Holy Trinity School on the day that I was invited to attend the Friday morning school assembly. Students in this clip will now be in their middle 20's. I do have a lot more as I went from class to class that Friday morning.

https://youtu.be/KkAbHVuHMCQ


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 12, 2016, 06:42:28 PM
I have just received an e-mail in my Junk Mail from Phil, which is all jumbled about Lightlands. Can you post your question here, or on the Proposed Chicken Farm.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 14, 2016, 08:52:35 PM
Further to the jumble queerie from Phil I have come up with the history as I know it from the early 1900's. Also the red line designates the footpath from the Maidenhead Road to Strand Lane.

https://youtu.be/2rxjIeDt3kI


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on July 14, 2016, 09:11:45 PM
James this man has been refused twice to open a chicken farm on this site, he is still going on with this plans in spite of this. He is digging up the field putting down hard stands, this will change the flood plain. A lot of residents have complained to the council still  has done  nothing has been done to move this man from the field. |It is so depressing to realise the council is doing nothing.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 14, 2016, 11:26:42 PM
Hi Monty, I know how upsetting it is to everyone. This Driver character certainly does not understand that he wasting time and money on a water meadow. Water that is flowing freely underground just a few feet, even in the driest of summers. It will rise as the river level rises. Why do you think it got the name of Lightland's, It was due to the fact that top soil is very shallow, before you reach gravel. Our forefathers had a reason to name fields the way they did.
It seems to me that the present owner is a Xxxxx or because he has built on the land, he hopes he can go ahead and develop it, as you can see with Cannon Court Farm.Waste money to make money.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on July 18, 2016, 07:59:53 PM
A good amount of farming logic behind what you say. It seems that Waldorf Astor did listen to members of his farm staff when it came to the use of ground that he purchased to expand White Place Farm, and how it was utilized.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on July 21, 2016, 10:40:33 PM
It would be better if the pasture was returned to a double crop of hay production, and the produce bales sold to local stables for winter use.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 01, 2016, 12:33:37 AM
It was eight years ago that the Webmaster & I launched Historical Cookham. It was hoped that people that I went to school with would join in chating over old times. That means now that there are fewer of us left, and quite a few of us emigrated away from the village to else where in the UK or even further afield.

https://youtu.be/ZYBDKl4xZ9I

There has been close to 182,000 visits to the site in the past eight years.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on August 03, 2016, 02:59:27 PM
And may you see many more.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 05, 2016, 01:21:23 AM
When one is searching for history, you never know what you will find. This takes me back to the old Rialto cinema in Maidenhead, about 1942. It was called "Target for Tonight and was produced by The Crown Film Unit. This is real recorded history, so enjoy it:

https://youtu.be/PDTLeFl8cXU


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 09, 2016, 07:44:04 PM
I have just had a note from South America asking about a painting of Frank Sherwin. Most of Cookham residents today would say, "Who was Frank Sherwin?"
If you travelled to town by train before the war you would have seen a lot of his posters in carriages and station platforms inviting to take a seaside holiday. You could find his work on LNER,LMS,GWR,& Southern routes. He also had a very interesting wartime job as well.

https://youtu.be/YbWNqh85aBU


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 10, 2016, 01:13:22 AM
To carry on with Frank Sherwin and his water colours, my inquiry from David in South America is to try and locate this town or village where Frank could have painted the scene depicted below. If you recognize the location please post your answer here as David will be following this post.

https://youtu.be/QC79kY-ceWk


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 10, 2016, 04:22:18 PM
I have just received this note from David K. Faille

James.
Please note that in my message I have mentioned that my Painting indicates on the Bottom Left, Old Hastings, in your Blog in 2012 you asked your followers if anyone knew what town it would be...
That is what I wanted to convey...
Regards.
David K. Faille

Maybe someone living in the Hastings, St Leonards area can recognize the exact location.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 19, 2016, 06:48:21 PM
We now switch to World War Two and the frequent roadside checks carried out on the traveling population who were even checked while driving a car, riding a bicycle, or even walking as an adult for an identity card. Although children had been issued with cards, they did not have to produce them except when travelling with their parents. These check points had at most times a  local policeman, who knew every child in his patch, for very good reasons!

https://youtu.be/fiZKIsdD9qc


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 03, 2016, 07:11:23 PM
Still with World War 2. With it comes the Ration Books. Issued once a year, then you would take it and register with your Grocer and Butcher. In the village that would be either Budgens or the International Stores. Your butcher was of course Dudley Sims.
Bread was not rationed until after the war with BU Units. This was a Labour austerity ploy. We had what was called the National Loaf. Which now i your wholewheat loaf. Oh yes the Hovis loaf was not affected.

https://youtu.be/Jtiuom-pOIE


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Lacrimosa on September 07, 2016, 11:08:30 PM
James, regarding your call out for people familiar with St Leonards in Hastings, I have connections there and have visited a couple of times in the past year. The painting does call to mind at least two or three corners along the seafront which jut off at a similar angle, although of course they are likely to have been much altered and redeveloped since then. I'll make some enquiries and get back to you if anything comes up.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 07, 2016, 11:40:18 PM
Thank you Lacrimosa. I am sure David Faille the present owner of the painting, would be interested in a photo of any area that the buildings fit the painting.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 09, 2016, 11:20:28 PM
The attached clip has a few shots of Cookham in 1958. It was I am sure the first of the "The Saint." television programmes with Roger Moore and his stop at The Ferry.

https://youtu.be/bvLgFpbdn4k

Anyway it will give newcomers to the village of what it looked like some 58 years ago.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Dragonman on September 13, 2016, 08:25:46 PM
I remember then James! Do you remember when Sid Field and Petula Clarke were in the film London Town, and they did a river sequence at Boulters Lock.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 19, 2016, 06:12:52 PM
Now we step back 74 years to the era of the Ration Book, and how we adapted to the use of rationing. If any of you have seen the film "Goodnight Mr. Tom." You will get a good idea of how the village pulled together at that time.

https://youtu.be/xKjaNoOmVSw



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 24, 2016, 04:05:31 AM
Necessity is the Mother of Invention, and this you Tube clip gives a good idea how people managed during the war years in the UK. Cookham of course was no exception, with everyone pulling together. So turn up your sound and watch this very good clip.

https://youtu.be/XYVKZsDwUwk


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 28, 2016, 07:15:02 PM
My next piece of History goes back to the mid 1930's when radio was with the BBC and two radio stars stick out in the persons of Arthur Askey and Richard Murdoch, with their programme "Band Wagon." A lot of other programmes kept us all smiling during war years. This little film clip came out after the war with the re-launch of television.The first television came to the village in 1936 in the home of Sir Algenon Guinness. Of course the BBC Alexandra Palace closed in 1939 for the duration of the
war. This clip, one of a series was produced in the early 1950's.
https://youtu.be/Cyds1GUPwr4


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 13, 2016, 07:13:15 PM
There was a time before television when it was possible to go to the cinema to see a film show. Maidenhead had three cinema houses, there was the Rialto, across from the Colonnade, the Plaza in Queen Street and one behind the Colonnade, which did not last long. Bourne End had the Royalty, and Marlow, the Odeon.
https://youtu.be/yV_3Ae1PWjI
The clip above is about Blondie and Dagwood Bumstead. At that time the cartoon time they had a great following. Actors, Penny Singleton and Arthur Lake were the main characters.
Today, "Blondie," is still to be found in the newspaper cartoon page. 


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 04, 2016, 12:58:08 AM
We now look an old but not forgotten footpath, one that takes you from Cookham all the way to Maidenhead. It was used by a good many villagers in my grandfathers time for the odd shopping trip.

https://youtu.be/DAlknwRmQXw

Turn up your sound and make a note of the directions.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 05, 2016, 05:13:11 PM
We now step back to the year 1940. The country was under threat of invasion. The government installed Pill Boxes at what they considered to critical points of the country road network. One such Pill Box was installed on the road just South of Widbrook. I have used a current photo, over which I have placed a 1940 Pill Box.
https://youtu.be/e3OzoFRQfq4

This will be my last Historical Post until mid January as I will be on the Paradise Island of Rarotonga in the South Pacific for Christmas and New Year.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: Winter on December 06, 2016, 10:44:32 PM
James - Do we get to have your alter ego 'Dragonman' keeping us entertained when you are on holiday? ;)


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on December 06, 2016, 11:43:56 PM
I don't know, you had better ask him. I think he lives in Cookham Dean.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on January 20, 2017, 08:28:10 PM
I have just come across a list of old English Currency. Some of which todays students may need to refer to:

Currency

Prior to Decimal Currency Day on 15th February, 1971, the English coinage system was based on the following relationships:

2 Farthings = 1 Halfpenny (ha'penny)
2 Halfpence = 1 Penny
2 Pence = Tuppence
3 Pence = Was the smallest English silver coin, known as a "Joey." Later it was minted in a twelve sided copper coin, known as a three penny bit.
6 Pence = Sixpence (often referred to as a tanner)
12 Pence = 1 Shilling (often referred to as bob. 
2 shillings = 1 Florin (or two bob bit)
2 Shillings and 6 Pence = 1 Half Crown (rarely referred to as half a dollar)
5 shillings = 1 Crown
10 shillings = Printed note. Often called a ten bob note.
The ten-shilling (or ten-bob) note, introduced in 1928, had only a short life. In 1971 it was replaced by the decimal equivalent, 50p.
20 Shillings = 1 Pound (often referred to as a quid)
21 Shillings = 1 Guinea. Was struck in Gold.
The ten-shilling (or ten-bob) note, introduced in 1928, had only a short life. In 1971 it was replaced by the decimal equivalent, 50p. 
The Five Pound Note was very rarely seen in use for daily shopping.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 12, 2017, 11:19:19 PM
For some unknown reason I was able to get back in. So now back to more history digging.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on February 25, 2017, 05:43:18 PM
Going back over my memories of Holy Trinity School and some of my old classmates, some I have to say have already shed their mortal coil. Our old teachers,  though we did not always see eye to eye with them, they did however did drill a lot of good common sense into our what they thought were thick skulls! The apple raids into Mrs. Cheeseman's orchard, all long gone and built over now. Back in early December, 1936. When the school put on the first Christmas Panto in the Pinder Hall, when Elsie Hales of 5 Hamfield Cottages played Snow White. If she is still with us, would be in her 90's now. I sang a duet "Lavenders Green." with a little blonde Joan Wainscott. Then of course we all knew PC's Tocock & Tubb, and of course Sgt, Easton. They may have rode bikes, but they knew their patch very well.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 05, 2017, 08:57:16 PM
I am going over the history of Cookham as it was in the year 1895. I have a pen and ink sketch of Holy Trinity Church and Bellrope Meadow from the river. There can be seen two fishermen, fishing from a moored punt. Yes fishing was a a lively-hood at that time:

https://youtu.be/4Bis51a0Ks0

I have also added a short description of the parish at that time, where it was bounded by the Thames to the north and east. The A4 to the south as far as the Thicket and the west to Bisham

Part One.

This is a description of the Parish and Village of Cookham as it was in the year 1895.

COOKHAM. Formerly a market town, is a beautiful village and parish, with a station on the branch of the Great Western railway from Maidenhead to High Wycombe, Thame, and Oxford, 3 miles to the north from Maidenhead, 16 miles north of Reading. 9 miles north east of Henley, and 27 miles from London, in the eastern division of the county, hundred and union of its own name. Maidenhead petty  sessional division court district of Windsor. Rural deanery of Maidehead. Archdeanery of Berkshire, and diocese of Oxford. This place is on the west bank of the river Thames, on the Bucks side of which are the highly picturesque and richly cultivated domains of Cliveden, Hedsor and Taplow. The portion of the river from Maidenhead up to Cookham Lock is considered the most beautiful in the whole course from Oxford to London.
Next time I will go over what area made up the Parish of Cookham and the various Hamlets within the Parish.



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: CLIPPER on May 08, 2017, 07:19:20 AM
Really have enjoyed reading this thread. Are there any photos (where possible) that can be uploaded? If only the Cookham's could be frozen in time...!

I was born in the wrong era :-[


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 10, 2017, 04:51:26 PM
Welcome on board Clipper. You can browse a lot of old Cookham photos if you Google "Frances Frith Cookham. A lot of them were taken by a village painter-decorator William Bailey, who took up photography as a hobby in the late 1800's. Yes, I grew up in a village where the village bobby rode a bicycle, and knew everyone on his patch. It seems that I am the only one of my vintage, that kept up with modern communication methods, including photography, still and video.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 17, 2017, 07:46:39 PM
Cookham Part 2.

In this part we will cover the church, and Wesleyan chapels.

Before the present iron bridge as a toll paying structure. There were at least two wooden structures and a chain link ferry, and before the river lock and weir was put in place, the river was fordable at several points. The present bridge is supported by seven iron pillars and was last overhauled in the spring of 2000 with a traffic light installed to control traffic in either direction.

The church of Holy Trinity is an ancient building of chalk, sandstone and flint, chiefly in the Early English style, with some portions of Norman, and consists of chancel, nave of four  bays, aisles, south porch and an embattled tower of massive proportions and turret, and at 1895 contained six bells and a clock: there are eleven stained windows and 600 pew seats.
The Register dates from the year 1662 the fourteenth of Charles II. The living is a vicarage, average value of tithe rent-charge £323, net £252, average yearly value, including five and one half acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of J.T. Rogers esq, and held since 1864 by the Rev. Reginald Wellford Rogers MA of Trinity College, Cambridge; the living was in 1297 was in the patronage of Eleanor, queen of Edward I. about which period it was appropriated by the abbey of St. Mary, Cirencester, which religious house presented to the vicarage in 1317. The Wesleyan chapel, built in 1846, seats 200 persons, and there is an iron Wesleyan chapel at Cookham Rise.
Coming back to Holy Trinity Church at this period of time the tower was covered in ivy. Shortly after this period the ivy was stripped off, due to the fact that was weakening the tower structure.

The next part I will cover the Workhouse of Cookham Union and its location.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 21, 2017, 04:53:26 PM
Here is a photo of three generations of the Hatch family taken by William Bailey. It has a voice over recording, so turn on your sound. Not mentioned in the clip, though if you look right against the wall you will see two empty beer barrels. My grandfather always drank from a 'Pot.' which holds a quart. The landlord of any local pub he visited  knew what his order would be, 'A Pot of ale.'

https://youtu.be/o36lKTNwzKo


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 26, 2017, 01:02:10 AM
I have started going back over buildings in the village and their history and the people who operated their business from that location. Most of you know this as only being a restaurant. So turn up your sound and listen.

https://youtu.be/oQCKXfwiDUM


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 28, 2017, 07:10:18 PM
I finally came across this William Bailey photo of Grandfathers cows grassing on the Moor and in the background is the old wrought iron footbridge that was replaced by the gracious gift to the village by Mrs. Bellfour-Allan in memory of her husband.

https://youtu.be/JS6e6SDDb04

Turn up your sound.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on May 30, 2017, 11:50:32 PM
I am now using my new voice over technique to high light the photo clip of My Lady Ferry.

https://youtu.be/agSt94Zwr3g

So turn up your sound.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 06, 2017, 11:18:03 PM
This building has quite a tale to tell. At one time rivaled some London club rules.

https://youtu.be/usDOfTjVBpY

So turn up your sound.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 11, 2017, 09:40:56 PM
With thanks to a very good friend I have this close up shot of the old Fleet Bridge be fore the present brick bridge of 1928, presented to the village by Mrs. Balfour-Allan. Also a complete family photo of the William Bailey's, seeing he had to get help with the lens cap shutter!

https://youtu.be/6ftDDExvAvA


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 17, 2017, 08:45:03 PM
William Shergold was a very well known person in the village. Besides being a shop keeper and Post Master, he was a stationer and fruiterer. He also ran a small printing business, printing his own local postcards. Like William Bailey his interests were varied.

https://youtu.be/DSK3K2P5u2k


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on June 28, 2017, 02:46:54 PM
Seeing that the present Stationmaster is about to retire. I have looked back in village records to find that the first village Stationmaster was William Shergold. The same man that I wrote about in my previous post.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 07, 2017, 01:47:13 AM
Here is a project that I have been working on for quite awhile. A little bit more of my childhood memories. It shows the neglect today of the Thames Water Authority.

https://youtu.be/ecUQ0LXSLqQ



Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 14, 2017, 12:49:39 AM
We now switch back to a very well known village character in the person of the village chemist, Pryce-Jones. A fiery person with a full red hair and beard. A man full of quips, and yet the village depended on him to cure their minor ailments.
There are many houses in Cookham that if it were possible could tell many tales of bygone days, and the Village Chemist shop was one of them. So turn up your sound and listen:

https://youtu.be/f8Jo_-DQxBs


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 16, 2017, 05:04:13 AM
We now move on to the next Compounding Chemist in the village, who was Glynn Henry. He was the person who got me involved in photo developing, which has followed me through ever since.
So here the story of Glynn Henry: https://youtu.be/GfoffwaDnEo

So turn up your sound.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 19, 2017, 12:15:40 AM
Still with village health. This time when Dr. V. Mercer moved his practice from Bourne End to Cookham.

https://youtu.be/w31sgT8E46Y

Turn up your sound.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on July 22, 2017, 09:39:55 PM
We now swing back to the 1930's and 40's Holy Trinity School and Cookham Secondary Modern. This first clip is a little too long, so in future I will try to keep it to one family or two at the most. After recording I remembered the name of the elder brother, it was Arthur Cracknell.
So turn up your sound, there maybe a name you will recognize.

https://youtu.be/OGC66inkyWI


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 01, 2017, 12:32:19 AM
Yes! It is the 1st of August, and nine years ago today the Webmaster started Digging up a little history. In nine years we have come quite a long way, changing our way of presentation somewhat. So turn up your sound and enjoy a piece of Birthday Cake.

https://youtu.be/AjViUtOiGpI


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 06, 2017, 11:11:20 PM
This is the story of the first student that was driven to school in 1935. From her home in Bradcutts Lane.

https://youtu.be/GTSfWsldkQk


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on August 25, 2017, 01:20:52 AM
Once again we go back into the eighteen hundreds and the village cottage industry of shoe and boot making. There will be another story of these cottages later.

https://youtu.be/7L5P_BdNWrI

Turn up your sound.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 09, 2017, 05:42:02 PM
In the 1930's and 40's The Carter family lived in #1. Keeley Cottages. The eldest son Brian passed away quite a few years ago. So turn up your sound.

https://youtu.be/JMTQh20e5tY


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 16, 2017, 08:42:29 PM
You may smile at the title of this next subject, but that is the way the vicar operated as he was also chairman of the school board, also very proud of his church choir. You may hear a buzz in the background from a seaplane taking off.

https://youtu.be/ZyhSo8kKybg


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: simonstendell on September 17, 2017, 09:48:46 PM
Dear James, Can you tell me where/when this photo was taken please? Thanks.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on September 17, 2017, 09:56:29 PM
James do  you remember anything about my grandfather Frederick Robinson `who  was Fire Chief at Cookham Fre Station. He lived in Terrys Lane and was born in the village in the cottages by the house called Moor Cottage


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 18, 2017, 04:19:15 AM
The classroom was run by Mrs. Snapes. That was the only class in 1937-38 that had a piano.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 18, 2017, 04:25:01 AM
Yes, I remember Fred Robinson. It was he that had a motorcycle and sidecar, which he used to answer all fire calls on. Also did he not run a garage on lower road.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: monty on September 18, 2017, 03:33:29 PM
Yes he did


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: simonstendell on September 18, 2017, 08:35:24 PM
I was wondering because the photo seems to show only boys.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 18, 2017, 09:03:21 PM
In those days the church choir was all male. That was all the vicar was interested in.
Boys came in from Mrs. Adams class as well. As I mentioned this was 1937-38, before the war. In 1939 with a influx of evacuees everything got mixed and changed.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: simonstendell on September 19, 2017, 02:37:36 PM
Yes of course. I had not factored in the male-only nature of the choir way back then!
Hard to believe in these days where Holy T has both a girls' choir and a ladies' choir (mothers of junior choristers), as well as the men's and boys' choirs.
Could you let me know the origin of this photo? I'm just wondering if there might be something from earlier in the '30s when my Dad would still have been a pupil.
Many thanks.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 19, 2017, 02:54:51 PM
Yes I will do if one happens to come my way. Old photos that I have on file of the village are mostly from old village families, who forward me the photos and the stories to go with them. The rest is based on what I gathered from family members and my paternal grandmother.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 23, 2017, 02:58:36 PM
We now take a closer look at the shops that were in existence in the village in the 1930's and 40's and the staff that worked in them. The first shop is Budgen's and their order and delivery service, which was carried out by a Jim Bond riding on the shop trade bike.

https://youtu.be/Ev1e9qU3CGQ


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on September 30, 2017, 02:40:57 AM
This I call Budgens part two. It covers Mr. Mont Lacey, who I got to know quite well.
It by the way, was the home of the village post office.

https://youtu.be/v0ah-z1c1p4

So once again turn your sound on.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 07, 2017, 12:36:21 AM
We now turn to the village butcher shop and slaughter house. Which was taken over after the first world war by one Dudley Sim who lived in Maidenhead Court and ran a large farm at Dorney, with a second butcher shop in Maidenhead.

Turn up your sound.

https://youtu.be/rMdarEc9mss


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 14, 2017, 08:56:05 PM
I am looking into digging deeper into the Saxon History of Poundfield. I could use a lot of still photos, and if by chance any video clips as well.
I will give credits to those, whose material I use. You can contact me through the Webmaster of Cookham.com.


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 21, 2017, 09:44:39 PM
If the village ever had a human dynamo it was Gwen Pinder-Browne. Not many of us left that knew her with bouncy walk and furs.

https://youtu.be/lB-a4N8H0nk


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on October 29, 2017, 08:17:36 PM
This is yet another pictorial map of Widbrook which I will use a a base for my tales of adventure in the 1930's and 40's.

https://youtu.be/WHJcvp7EL04


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 05, 2017, 04:07:45 PM
Me, my dog and I. Plus an orchard and a reed bed and lots of exciting memories.
Turn up your sound.

https://youtu.be/BVblA2UaV_o


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 10, 2017, 10:09:42 PM
Another flowering beauty that bloomed every Spring on Widbrook East, sadly I seems that this is no more. I am talking about the Marsh Marigold.
So turn up your sound.

https://youtu.be/niI1xqT1x7U


Title: Re: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------
Post by: James Hatch on November 17, 2017, 10:24:55 PM
In the clip number 4 I have brought up the history of the extension of Maidenhead into the Parish of Cookham in 1934. The Southey fields have a lot of happy memories, for me it was my happy hunting ground for rabbits.
So turn up your sound and watch and listen:

https://youtu.be/4UYGBQjLJho