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Author Topic: dogs barking on lower road  (Read 11718 times)
pussg
Newbie
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Posts: 3


« on: April 02, 2008, 02:51:31 PM »

who ever has the blasted dogs going frantic all day long on lower road please look after them properly - their barking is driving me mad!!
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Woof Woof
Guest
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2008, 03:37:11 PM »

Do you think someone should contact the RSPCA or police, as the dogs cannot be happy to be barking all the time. Which house is it? Surely the neighbours must be fed up.
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pussg
Newbie
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Posts: 3


« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2008, 03:41:19 PM »

I don't know - I'm on high road but have heard them barking all day long - they really don't sound happy.
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old bill
Newbie
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Posts: 8


« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2008, 03:50:18 PM »

we will have a look today
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pussg
Newbie
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Posts: 3


« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2008, 03:57:03 PM »

thanks Old Bill.  I suspect someone turfs them out in the garden while they are at work all day. Poor things (and poor neighbours).
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Jo Jo
Full Member
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Posts: 228


« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2008, 05:28:58 PM »

It is only recently they have started barking, I think yesterday morning. Perhaps it is someone new who has just moved in. The owners may not even be aware that the dogs are barking.
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Philip
Guest
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2008, 09:43:19 PM »

We can only apologise for the inconvenience caused - to answer some of the questions...He is a new puppy whom we collected only 6 days ago and who has been brought up in a kennel and run to date. Unfortunately he had not been separated from his mother and is now 4 months old so is undergoing some separation issues which we had hoped to resolve. We can assure you that he is not being left alone while we are out and have arranged for someone to come in. Apart from the barking, he is a very loving and biddable dog whom we adore. We are going through the process of training upon the vet's recommendation, but had obviously not appreciated the amount of offence this would cause in such a short period of time particularly regarding noise levels. The plan in the long term is for him to come with me during the day. However, we are trying to address some of your issues and thus have arranged for slightly more help tomorrow (it's rather last minute) and would ask you to bear with us tomorrow. He should be quiet from about 10.30am on Friday for most of the day, so this should help with the noise issues. This situation will be rectified over the week-end with only short spells of him being left alone for training purposes. We have had a large kennel and run built especially with his best interests at heart. I hope this goes some way to explaining the situation and we can only apologise for the disturbance.
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Doggy Person
Guest
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2008, 12:47:41 AM »

I thought a reason dogs bark when left alone is that they were calling for their owners to come back, so when they eventually do the dog thinks it worked. It goes back to the wolf howling to locate the pack. You can try and train the dog to bark on command by say teasing it a bit and then say speak, when it barks praise it then teach it to be quiet by saying stop or quiet or whatever and giving it a treat when it does.  Eventually the dog will associate a treat with stopping barking.
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Dog lover
Guest
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2008, 03:10:53 PM »

Philip, as one dog owner to another, I empathise with the barking problem although, with the training you are giving your puppy (and no doubt are having yourself!), this is only likely to be temporary. 

Owning a pup is full of unexpected hurdles and your message of concern addressing the queries will hopefully console others who (knowing the kindness of most Cookham people) will be far more concerned about the dog’s welfare than the barking, unless it goes on and on.

All the teething troubles with a dog prove worthwhile and full of rewards; once he gains confidence, he will soon quieten down but, as you say, there will still be a few barks while training him and patience is needed all round. So, please, neighbours, for the time being, buy yourselves some cotton wool from Brunsden's and give this very young, vulnerable pup and his owners a break!

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Lynda M
Guest
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2008, 10:05:21 AM »

It's been going on long enough.  Owners were home over weekend and and hence dog was ok.
Now it's Monday morning, people are trying to work or sleep if night-shift workers.
Do something more positive please owner or perhaps buy a second dog for company?
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Paris
Guest
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2008, 11:14:47 AM »

Poor doggy, I'm sure he's not too happy about all his barking either, unfortunately though stressed animals, like stressed humans need sympathy and help to get over their problems.  The owners are doing all they can, and with time the puppy will settle and get used to his new routines and way of life. Until then I think everyone should stop moaning and support his owner in his efforts to ease the poor pup's loneliness and confusion.  Of course it can be annoying for those who don't understand or don't like dogs, but complaining is not helping the puppy he doesn't know you're upset and it's rather difficult explaining your complaints to another species whose first language is not English.  So for pups sake and your own stress levels - calm down!
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Doggy Person
Guest
« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2008, 11:47:35 AM »

Dogs are pack animals; it is unnatural for them to be left alone for long periods on their own. They are entirely dependant on their owner for stimulation. Sleeping all day or in this case barking all day is no life and a pointless existence.
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JW
Guest
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2008, 12:51:58 PM »

Philip says that the pup is not left alone all day. I agree with Paris that some consideration is needed here for both dog and owner, as no dog is trained in five minutes - it requires a great deal of ongoing time and patience (despite Victoria Stilwell's impressions otherwise - that TV series must be massively cut).

Dogs can be very insecure and the pup is obviously missing the company of his mother and siblings as well as his new owners, so no wonder he is lonely and confused. He is also getting used to his new home but, before he has even developed a feeling of security there, he is left in a strange new run and garden, so must feel extra vulnerable. While his owners are out, he may feel far more secure in his own doggy crate indoors containing his own bedding, chews and safe toys, as long as he was let outside for a while every couple of hours.

Doggy Person - you sound an experienced trainer, so why don't you have a chat to Philip and try to help and advise him? Surely a positive and helpful approach from someone as knowledgeable as yourself is more constructive for Philip and pup than receiving ongoing criticism? All new dog owners have to learn just as much as their pets and so need all the advice and assitance they can get.
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Julian
Guest
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2008, 02:45:47 PM »

So lets cut to the quick. It's Tuesday....is the dog still barking?  Huh
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Doggy Person
Guest
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2008, 03:40:06 PM »

If you do need to be out during the day you can make your dog's life better by making sure he has plenty to do when you are with him so that he learns to rest while you are out and be active when you are at home. Keep him physically active by giving him plenty of walks and games with toys, and teach him tricks and other things that will exercise his mind.

Get up early and spend an hour with your dog before work so that he is tired when you leave him. Also arrange for someone to come in at lunch time and give him some games with toys - this will break his day up. Your dog should not be left alone for more than four hours and will need a couple of walks a day depending on his size.

The Blue Cross have done a Home Alone leaflet, it includes:

• Exercise your dog, with a walk and by playing games, well in advance of leaving so that your dog has time to settle down
• When you go out, do not say goodbye – just walk out. The contrast between you being there and not being there is then much reduced.
• Provide a small meal a short time before departure so that your dog is more likely to be sleepy
• Leave your dog somewhere where any damage done will be minimised. This should be well away from electrical wires and valuables, and where any barking is least likely to annoy neighbours. It is important to leave your pet in the house, where they will feel most secure, rather than out in the garden.
• Leave the animal with something special to chew – a large rawhide chew with small titbits forced between the layers will keep your dog occupied and distracted during the first few minutes of your departure. It is in the first few minutes that your dog feels most distressed so this helps the animal cope and become accustomed to being alone.
• Wearing an old sweater or T-shirt before leaving and putting it in your dog’s bed will sometimes help. You need to renew your scent on this garment each time you leave the house – leaving it at the bottom of the dirty laundry basket will save you from having to wear it each time.
• Some dogs are comforted by the familiar sound of a radio playing – or you could record 30 minutes of your family’s conversation and play this as you leave
• When you return, greeting rituals should be kept short and without great excitement. Do not, on any account, punish, scold or be angry with your dog. Consider it your fault if something has gone wrong and seek further help if necessary.
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