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Author Topic: Let's see how much history we can dig up? :----------------------  (Read 322289 times)
James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #795 on: November 13, 2016, 07:13:15 PM »

There was a time before television when it was possible to go to the cinema to see a film show. Maidenhead had three cinema houses, there was the Rialto, across from the Colonnade, the Plaza in Queen Street and one behind the Colonnade, which did not last long. Bourne End had the Royalty, and Marlow, the Odeon.
https://youtu.be/yV_3Ae1PWjI
The clip above is about Blondie and Dagwood Bumstead. At that time the cartoon time they had a great following. Actors, Penny Singleton and Arthur Lake were the main characters.
Today, "Blondie," is still to be found in the newspaper cartoon page. 
« Last Edit: December 05, 2016, 04:55:43 PM by James Hatch » Logged
James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #796 on: December 04, 2016, 12:58:08 AM »

We now look an old but not forgotten footpath, one that takes you from Cookham all the way to Maidenhead. It was used by a good many villagers in my grandfathers time for the odd shopping trip.

https://youtu.be/DAlknwRmQXw

Turn up your sound and make a note of the directions.
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #797 on: December 05, 2016, 05:13:11 PM »

We now step back to the year 1940. The country was under threat of invasion. The government installed Pill Boxes at what they considered to critical points of the country road network. One such Pill Box was installed on the road just South of Widbrook. I have used a current photo, over which I have placed a 1940 Pill Box.
https://youtu.be/e3OzoFRQfq4

This will be my last Historical Post until mid January as I will be on the Paradise Island of Rarotonga in the South Pacific for Christmas and New Year.
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Winter
Jr. Member
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Posts: 59


« Reply #798 on: December 06, 2016, 10:44:32 PM »

James - Do we get to have your alter ego 'Dragonman' keeping us entertained when you are on holiday? Wink
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #799 on: December 06, 2016, 11:43:56 PM »

I don't know, you had better ask him. I think he lives in Cookham Dean.
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #800 on: January 20, 2017, 08:28:10 PM »

I have just come across a list of old English Currency. Some of which todays students may need to refer to:

Currency

Prior to Decimal Currency Day on 15th February, 1971, the English coinage system was based on the following relationships:

2 Farthings = 1 Halfpenny (ha'penny)
2 Halfpence = 1 Penny
2 Pence = Tuppence
3 Pence = Was the smallest English silver coin, known as a "Joey." Later it was minted in a twelve sided copper coin, known as a three penny bit.
6 Pence = Sixpence (often referred to as a tanner)
12 Pence = 1 Shilling (often referred to as bob. 
2 shillings = 1 Florin (or two bob bit)
2 Shillings and 6 Pence = 1 Half Crown (rarely referred to as half a dollar)
5 shillings = 1 Crown
10 shillings = Printed note. Often called a ten bob note.
The ten-shilling (or ten-bob) note, introduced in 1928, had only a short life. In 1971 it was replaced by the decimal equivalent, 50p.
20 Shillings = 1 Pound (often referred to as a quid)
21 Shillings = 1 Guinea. Was struck in Gold.
The ten-shilling (or ten-bob) note, introduced in 1928, had only a short life. In 1971 it was replaced by the decimal equivalent, 50p. 
The Five Pound Note was very rarely seen in use for daily shopping.
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #801 on: February 12, 2017, 11:19:19 PM »

For some unknown reason I was able to get back in. So now back to more history digging.
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #802 on: February 25, 2017, 05:43:18 PM »

Going back over my memories of Holy Trinity School and some of my old classmates, some I have to say have already shed their mortal coil. Our old teachers,  though we did not always see eye to eye with them, they did however did drill a lot of good common sense into our what they thought were thick skulls! The apple raids into Mrs. Cheeseman's orchard, all long gone and built over now. Back in early December, 1936. When the school put on the first Christmas Panto in the Pinder Hall, when Elsie Hales of 5 Hamfield Cottages played Snow White. If she is still with us, would be in her 90's now. I sang a duet "Lavenders Green." with a little blonde Joan Wainscott. Then of course we all knew PC's Tocock & Tubb, and of course Sgt, Easton. They may have rode bikes, but they knew their patch very well.
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #803 on: May 05, 2017, 08:57:16 PM »

I am going over the history of Cookham as it was in the year 1895. I have a pen and ink sketch of Holy Trinity Church and Bellrope Meadow from the river. There can be seen two fishermen, fishing from a moored punt. Yes fishing was a a lively-hood at that time:

https://youtu.be/4Bis51a0Ks0

I have also added a short description of the parish at that time, where it was bounded by the Thames to the north and east. The A4 to the south as far as the Thicket and the west to Bisham

Part One.

This is a description of the Parish and Village of Cookham as it was in the year 1895.

COOKHAM. Formerly a market town, is a beautiful village and parish, with a station on the branch of the Great Western railway from Maidenhead to High Wycombe, Thame, and Oxford, 3 miles to the north from Maidenhead, 16 miles north of Reading. 9 miles north east of Henley, and 27 miles from London, in the eastern division of the county, hundred and union of its own name. Maidenhead petty  sessional division court district of Windsor. Rural deanery of Maidehead. Archdeanery of Berkshire, and diocese of Oxford. This place is on the west bank of the river Thames, on the Bucks side of which are the highly picturesque and richly cultivated domains of Cliveden, Hedsor and Taplow. The portion of the river from Maidenhead up to Cookham Lock is considered the most beautiful in the whole course from Oxford to London.
Next time I will go over what area made up the Parish of Cookham and the various Hamlets within the Parish.

« Last Edit: May 07, 2017, 06:07:26 PM by James Hatch » Logged
CLIPPER
Jr. Member
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Posts: 84


« Reply #804 on: May 08, 2017, 07:19:20 AM »

Really have enjoyed reading this thread. Are there any photos (where possible) that can be uploaded? If only the Cookham's could be frozen in time...!

I was born in the wrong era Embarrassed
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #805 on: May 10, 2017, 04:51:26 PM »

Welcome on board Clipper. You can browse a lot of old Cookham photos if you Google "Frances Frith Cookham. A lot of them were taken by a village painter-decorator William Bailey, who took up photography as a hobby in the late 1800's. Yes, I grew up in a village where the village bobby rode a bicycle, and knew everyone on his patch. It seems that I am the only one of my vintage, that kept up with modern communication methods, including photography, still and video.
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #806 on: May 17, 2017, 07:46:39 PM »

Cookham Part 2.

In this part we will cover the church, and Wesleyan chapels.

Before the present iron bridge as a toll paying structure. There were at least two wooden structures and a chain link ferry, and before the river lock and weir was put in place, the river was fordable at several points. The present bridge is supported by seven iron pillars and was last overhauled in the spring of 2000 with a traffic light installed to control traffic in either direction.

The church of Holy Trinity is an ancient building of chalk, sandstone and flint, chiefly in the Early English style, with some portions of Norman, and consists of chancel, nave of four  bays, aisles, south porch and an embattled tower of massive proportions and turret, and at 1895 contained six bells and a clock: there are eleven stained windows and 600 pew seats.
The Register dates from the year 1662 the fourteenth of Charles II. The living is a vicarage, average value of tithe rent-charge £323, net £252, average yearly value, including five and one half acres of glebe, with residence, in the gift of J.T. Rogers esq, and held since 1864 by the Rev. Reginald Wellford Rogers MA of Trinity College, Cambridge; the living was in 1297 was in the patronage of Eleanor, queen of Edward I. about which period it was appropriated by the abbey of St. Mary, Cirencester, which religious house presented to the vicarage in 1317. The Wesleyan chapel, built in 1846, seats 200 persons, and there is an iron Wesleyan chapel at Cookham Rise.
Coming back to Holy Trinity Church at this period of time the tower was covered in ivy. Shortly after this period the ivy was stripped off, due to the fact that was weakening the tower structure.

The next part I will cover the Workhouse of Cookham Union and its location.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 03:13:55 PM by James Hatch » Logged
James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #807 on: May 21, 2017, 04:53:26 PM »

Here is a photo of three generations of the Hatch family taken by William Bailey. It has a voice over recording, so turn on your sound. Not mentioned in the clip, though if you look right against the wall you will see two empty beer barrels. My grandfather always drank from a 'Pot.' which holds a quart. The landlord of any local pub he visited  knew what his order would be, 'A Pot of ale.'

https://youtu.be/o36lKTNwzKo
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #808 on: May 26, 2017, 01:02:10 AM »

I have started going back over buildings in the village and their history and the people who operated their business from that location. Most of you know this as only being a restaurant. So turn up your sound and listen.

https://youtu.be/oQCKXfwiDUM
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James Hatch
Golden Hatch
******
Posts: 2288


« Reply #809 on: May 28, 2017, 07:10:18 PM »

I finally came across this William Bailey photo of Grandfathers cows grassing on the Moor and in the background is the old wrought iron footbridge that was replaced by the gracious gift to the village by Mrs. Bellfour-Allan in memory of her husband.

https://youtu.be/JS6e6SDDb04

Turn up your sound.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 07:29:55 PM by James Hatch » Logged
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