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Author Topic: Chickens Again (Will this never go away?)  (Read 27404 times)
Ralph
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« Reply #60 on: May 31, 2016, 12:32:15 PM »

Looking at those Chicken Sheds whilst walking the dog at the weekend through 'colditz' ....the sheds that have been placed out in the filed, do not look as though they could house such large flocks of hens as this young farmer is wanting.

As someone else mentioned, where is the Water and Electric supply being fed from?

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James Hatch
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« Reply #61 on: June 05, 2016, 03:49:14 AM »

From information that I have gathered from various sources, it looks like a free range operation to me, and the coops can be moved as they are on wheels. Water and food can be brought in daily. As the coops are on wheels they can not be termed as permanent structures.
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monty
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« Reply #62 on: June 05, 2016, 08:20:11 PM »

Thanks for that James that's all we need. You are not  living with the threat of smelly chickens and you ae telling us he is within his rights to put these sheds on etc . You are unbelievable. We don't want to live with this smelly chicken farm.
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James Hatch
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« Reply #63 on: June 06, 2016, 12:09:13 AM »

Sorry to upset you Monty, but if he were to have 'Battery,' production, then that would be a "Hen of a different Feather!" Free range does not carry the odour that you are thinking of, whereas, Battery produced eggs do. That is why Free Range production is very popular, as there is a difference in the flavour over the Battery produced eggs. During the war a lot of villagers kept chickens in their back garden and fed them on table scraps gathered from friends and neighbours, in exchange for a few eggs in return.
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Roger
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« Reply #64 on: June 06, 2016, 02:31:19 AM »

James, an EU directive banned battery hens in 2012, so I don't think they would be allowed to set them up now in UK.
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Ralph
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« Reply #65 on: June 06, 2016, 08:03:20 AM »


I used to work on a 'Free- Range' chicken farm that was in Winkfield (Maidens Green) - and I can tell you.... its noisy and every two years when the slatted floors were taken up, to be jet washed.. and the muck removed by a tractor - it stank !

When the hens go broody (approximate at 2 years old) this is when they are stuffed 5 to a create, creates are then stacked on top of each other on a lorry - and off they go to slaughter...

Then the chicken house is closed up.. and then the 'pest bombs' are set off... then a 2 week break and airing... then the cycle starts all over again.

Its not about egg collecting ... it actually is not such a pleasant business to have.....

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Explorer
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« Reply #66 on: June 06, 2016, 01:14:56 PM »

Actually I think James makes a very good point that we must at least be grateful for a free range business. I think it must have been a few years since you worked on a chicken farm Ralph as I've now visited a few of the ones we have around us which are using the proposed housing systems to see what we are actually dealing with. I found there to be very little smell at all and much less than some of the horse manure which some owners fail to properly manage in the village.
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Watchman
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« Reply #67 on: June 06, 2016, 03:46:45 PM »

Errrr ... I'm lost here!
A few questions therefore ...

*Do the two "wheelie" henhouses mean that the chickens stay locked in 24/7?
*And is Fortress Colditz and its wire fencing around the perimeter designed and erected
  to keep the chickens in (perhaps they are free to roam, having been deemed "free range"?) .... and the foxes out?
*Or is all that fencing to deter poachers nipping in for a bird or two (plus eggs) for the Sunday roast?
*Just how far up or down field are these hen houses pushed?  And who by ... a gang of of hen pushers? (Sorry)
*Finally, what if the field floods, as is distinctly possible these days?
*Who then gathers up the drowned birds prior to spraying the place with expensive cologne to nullify the rotting smell?

Thank you for your patience.

PS. I prefer lamb, duck or venison meself! Chicken is terribly overrated IMHO.

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Explorer
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« Reply #68 on: June 06, 2016, 06:13:35 PM »

Haha dear me Watchman I'm glad we can always rely on you to make comedy of these situation.
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monty
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« Reply #69 on: June 06, 2016, 06:42:12 PM »

How near do you live to these hen houses. We do not want a chicken farm in our back yard thank you, and all your comments about it doesn't smell etc. does not help. The value of peoples houses in the near vicinity will drop.
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James Hatch
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« Reply #70 on: June 06, 2016, 08:11:00 PM »

Do you know Explorer to read what Watchman had to say made me smile. It brought my mind back to the early 1940,s when when youngsters from London were evacuated to the  country, and could not understand that milk came from cows, as they thought it came from a bottle! For centuries, the Cookham's have been a farming based community, with a small number of residents who resided in the village, but had business interests in the City. In the early 1900's when the Astor's took over Cliveden and purchased White Place Farm and introduced production of TT milk, becoming the first farm in the country to do so. The milk produced was sold to Holy Trinity School and other schools in the area and some as far away as schools run by the London County Council at cost. At Holy Trinity the cost was a half penny a gill bottle per day. This we drank at our mid morning break.
Nowadays, farming is in the hands of a few, who have no interest in getting their hands dirty with a little hard work. Council members, once elected, go into hibernation in their so called Cabinet Room, relying on information fed to them by local civil servants. Who most likely migrated from London and have no idea how a country community like Cookham should be preserved and run. One has to embrace the joys and smells of the country life,
even if you hate the smell of good farmyard dung! Remember when it is recycled, it does produce good food and beautiful flowers.
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monty
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« Reply #71 on: June 06, 2016, 09:27:43 PM »

But not the smells of a chicken farm on our doorstep, I like the smells of the country but not this and the flies you don't  live here James I do and I don't like it.
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James Hatch
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« Reply #72 on: June 06, 2016, 10:16:34 PM »

I wonder Monty if your memory goes back to Cookham Rural District Council, and a vehical we kids called "Lavender Liz." Who would visit houses about every six weeks to empty sewage tanks, then take the contents to the council sewage farm, which was located just east of the railway line by the halfway houses on Maidenhead Road. I was told a while ago now that that area is now allotments. I know Monty you are against any more houses being built, but the land still has to be productive, you need home produced food, otherwise there will be no countryside left. I may live far away, but I still have fond memories of the village where I grew up.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2016, 10:26:04 PM by James Hatch » Logged
Watchman
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« Reply #73 on: June 07, 2016, 09:46:56 AM »

How near do you live to these hen houses. We do not want a chicken farm in our back yard thank you, and all your comments about it doesn't smell etc. does not help. The value of peoples houses in the near vicinity will drop.

This is not in my back yard monty, but rest assured, I support you and the rest of the residents affected by this blight 100 percent.
My frivolous post was meant to lighten the mood, perhaps I over-egged it some, nevertheless, the situation regarding
the "illegal" erection of hen-houses and the free roaming of 3,000 hens in an area close to houses and one prone to flooding is
an absolute nonsense, but one which seems to pass way over the councillors heads. You could say (frivolously again) that they are all
running around like headless chickens whilst attempting to seek a solution, postponing meetings to deal with the subject along the way.

BASICALLY, IT IS ENTIRELY IN THE RBWM COUNCILLORS HANDS TO PUT A STOP TO THIS CHARADE ONCE AND FOR ALL.

But in my book, and judging from their past record in such circumstances, (especially the Cookham Ward councillors)
don't expect them to 'grow a pair' overnight and actually do something about it.

  
« Last Edit: June 07, 2016, 09:48:42 AM by Watchman » Logged
Paris
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« Reply #74 on: June 07, 2016, 01:37:02 PM »

James your comments, whilst interesting from a historic perspective do not take account of modern practice, and are not at all helpful to those who are potentially faced with the nightmare of a 3,500 chicken farm on their doorsteps.  This is a very sensitive subject for those people who do not wish to have this foisted upon them on (as you must surely with your knowledge agree) in a totally unsuitable area and on a totally unsuitable piece of land.

The two sheds currently in situ are moveable, but even so - where to in the event of a flood?  As I understand it there could be another 5 - 7 of those in addition to the 32 m portable (hardly - cough, cough) building that is the subject of the planning meeting. 

Just as a further nod to modern practice, I've heard that there is a chicken rescue place in Crowthorne from which year old hens may be rehomed at the end of their 'working' life; their latest influx is a batch of year old hens from the egg operation in Cookham Dean.  So they definitely do clear out after a year and this is what this person at Strande Lane wants to do, and he's already intimated in his original application that cleaning out will only be happening at the yearly swap over of stock, hardly hygienic for the hens or local residents.
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