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Author Topic: Fruit trees on Lower Road  (Read 714 times)
Showem
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« on: September 13, 2017, 09:56:07 AM »

Does anyone know what kind of fruit trees grow on the stretch of Lower Road from the chemist to the post office? They look very much like small pears. Just wondering if anything edible could be made from the fruit.
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Paris
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Posts: 65


« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 01:35:10 PM »

I wouldn't just think of all the nasty chemicals their roots will have taken up from water being splashed from the road
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Showem
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« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2017, 05:26:59 PM »

Hmm, maybe. I'd still like to know what they are.
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James Hatch
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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2017, 06:15:10 PM »

Showem, two trees come to mind that fit your description. the first is an old tree that was in many a village orchard, and that was the Quince. The second along with Oranges and Lemons that now seem to do well in Southern England, and that is the Kumquat or Cumquat, depending on the spelling. These trees are native in Australia and New Zealand.
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Simes
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« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2017, 09:41:42 PM »

Crab apples I believe. Here's a recipe for crab apple jelly....https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/7661/crab-apple-jelly
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 09:43:36 PM by Simes » Logged
Birdman
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« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2017, 10:41:24 PM »

I think Simes is right, but it highlights an issue for the Local Plan and ongoing development where we need to suggest that such planting should not be undertaken right at the side of the rood and above pavements as shortly there will be the annual slimy and mushy coating of crushed fruits for the next few weeks, as no-one picks them. There are other more suitable species that could be used.
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James Hatch
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« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2017, 12:03:59 AM »

Showem said that it was small and pear shape. click below for a photo of a Quince.

https://youtu.be/P-mecLopkpQ

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Roger
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« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2017, 12:20:41 PM »

I think it is definitely not a quince. I have one in my garden.

There is a tree with quite big apples along High Road opposite the station. Also some greengages behind the Parade buildings. I think most of the fruit goes to waste.
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Paris
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Posts: 65


« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2017, 01:31:05 PM »

The fruit might go to waste, but think of the value of having the trees, they provide food for bees, insects, birds, caterpillars, etc and us with a green and pleasant village. Would you rather they weren't there because of a bit if messy fruit?
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Bagheera
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Posts: 423

e tenebris lux


« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2017, 05:16:08 PM »

We have crab apple jelly with pork as an alternative to apple sauce.

I make crab apple chutney and you can make crab apple wine.

Much of our fruit still goes to waste

But at least some goes to waist!
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Simes
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Posts: 117


« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2017, 05:28:39 PM »

It's not quince, I walk past them every day and they are crab apples.
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